A Momentary Flow

Updating Worldviews one World at a time

It is a funny sort of excess, this not-not negativity, this multiplicity of the inbetween (i.e. the negative ‘between-ness’ of the not and its other). A kind of spiralling (or, anyway, dizzing) interiority which regurgitates right outside the limit, and in that wake, constitutes it: neither/nor. Indeed, it is, precisely, a surface, or even a strategy of surfaces.

(Sue Golding, ‘Curiosity’)
Golding
emergentfutures:


Eating food could be replaced by nanorobot nutrient delivery system.


By early 2030s, experts predict nanorobots will be developed to improve the human digestive system, and by 2040, as radical as this sounds, we could eliminate our need for food and eating.
   This is the vision of futurist Ray Kurzweil and nutritionist Terry Grossman, M.D., in their popular book, Fantastic Voyage: Live Long Enough to Live Forever. In the coming decades, the authors claim, “We will be able to reengineer the way we provide nutrients to our trillions of cells.”
Full Story: ieet

emergentfutures:

Eating food could be replaced by nanorobot nutrient delivery system.

By early 2030s, experts predict nanorobots will be developed to improve the human digestive system, and by 2040, as radical as this sounds, we could eliminate our need for food and eating.

   This is the vision of futurist Ray Kurzweil and nutritionist Terry Grossman, M.D., in their popular book, Fantastic Voyage: Live Long Enough to Live Forever. In the coming decades, the authors claim, “We will be able to reengineer the way we provide nutrients to our trillions of cells.”

Full Story: ieet

(via futurescope)

seeinnovation:

Award-winning Game: Meta!Blast: The Leaf is a game that immerses the player in the action on and in a leaf. Intended as a supplement to in-class instruction for high school students, it lets users pilot a miniature bioship across a strange landscape, which features nematodes and a lumbering tardigrade. Users can dive into individual cells and zoom around a chloroplast, activating photosynthesis with their ship’s search lamp. By conveying the complexity and visual interest of a biological system, Eve Wurtele and her team seek to increase student engagement with science and encourage a strong foundation in STEM.
This entry was a People’s Choice winner in the newly renamed science and engineering visualization challenge: The Vizzies.
Credit: Eve Syrkin Wurtele, William Schneller, Paul Klippel, Greg Hanes, Andrew Navratil and Diane Bassham, Iowa State University

Do you love animating data, creating science apps, or taking macrophotographs? In the 2014 Visualization Challenge, sponsored by the National Science Foundation and Popular Science, your handiwork can receive its due glory and win you cash prizes. Find out more here.

seeinnovation:

Award-winning Game: Meta!Blast: The Leaf is a game that immerses the player in the action on and in a leaf. Intended as a supplement to in-class instruction for high school students, it lets users pilot a miniature bioship across a strange landscape, which features nematodes and a lumbering tardigrade. Users can dive into individual cells and zoom around a chloroplast, activating photosynthesis with their ship’s search lamp. By conveying the complexity and visual interest of a biological system, Eve Wurtele and her team seek to increase student engagement with science and encourage a strong foundation in STEM.

This entry was a People’s Choice winner in the newly renamed science and engineering visualization challenge: The Vizzies.

Credit: Eve Syrkin Wurtele, William Schneller, Paul Klippel, Greg Hanes, Andrew Navratil and Diane Bassham, Iowa State University

Do you love animating data, creating science apps, or taking macrophotographs? In the 2014 Visualization Challenge, sponsored by the National Science Foundation and Popular Science, your handiwork can receive its due glory and win you cash prizes. Find out more here.

Reblogged from NSF: SEE Innovation

Infobesium

Infobesium: The aggregate (data) matter of (unprocessed) information in the modern hyperconnected mind.

Infobesium: A new kind of (emergent?) matter composed mainly of residue data, perceived (read or heard) by a modern hyperconnected mind and unprocessed, therefore remaining untouched by critical thought.

Infobesium: A byproduct of being subjected to a constant stream of infodata that has no possible way of being either accommodated ,digested or spat out for its sheer quantity, memetic attractiveness and perceptual saturation. 

related terms

Infobesity :The illness resulting from consuming too much information that the current mind cannot process.

Infobesiology :Defines itself as the future possible science of researching, finding and eliminating the causes processes and consequences of too much unprocessed and non digested infodata.

Please suggest usages

Neurons reveal the brain’s learning limit - Carnegie Mellon University, Stanford University, University of Pittsburgh Original Study - Scientists have discovered a fundamental constraint in the brain that may explain why it’s easier to learn a skill that’s related to an ability you already have. For example, a trained pianist can learn a new melody easier than learning how to hit a tennis serve. As reported in Nature, the researchers found for the first time that there are limitations on how adaptable the brain is during learning and that these restrictions are a key determinant for whether a new skill will be easy or difficult to learn. Understanding how the brain’s activity can be “flexed” during learning could eventually be used to develop better treatments for stroke and other brain injuries. Lead author Patrick T. Sadtler, a Ph.D. candidate in the University of Pittsburgh department of bioengineering, compared the study’s findings to cooking. “Suppose you have flour, sugar, baking soda, eggs, salt, and milk. You can combine them to make different items—bread, pancakes, and cookies—but it would be difficult to make hamburger patties with the existing ingredients,” Sadtler says. “We found that the brain works in a similar way during learning. We found that subjects were able to more readily recombine familiar activity patterns in new ways relative to creating entirely novel patterns.” (via Neurons reveal the brain’s learning limit - Futurity)

Neurons reveal the brain’s learning limit
-
Carnegie Mellon University, Stanford University, University of Pittsburgh Original Study
-
Scientists have discovered a fundamental constraint in the brain that may explain why it’s easier to learn a skill that’s related to an ability you already have. For example, a trained pianist can learn a new melody easier than learning how to hit a tennis serve. As reported in Nature, the researchers found for the first time that there are limitations on how adaptable the brain is during learning and that these restrictions are a key determinant for whether a new skill will be easy or difficult to learn. Understanding how the brain’s activity can be “flexed” during learning could eventually be used to develop better treatments for stroke and other brain injuries. Lead author Patrick T. Sadtler, a Ph.D. candidate in the University of Pittsburgh department of bioengineering, compared the study’s findings to cooking. “Suppose you have flour, sugar, baking soda, eggs, salt, and milk. You can combine them to make different items—bread, pancakes, and cookies—but it would be difficult to make hamburger patties with the existing ingredients,” Sadtler says. “We found that the brain works in a similar way during learning. We found that subjects were able to more readily recombine familiar activity patterns in new ways relative to creating entirely novel patterns.” (via Neurons reveal the brain’s learning limit - Futurity)

High-Flying Algae Airships are Self-Sufficient Airborne Cities
-
Architect Vincent Callebaut recently unveiled a blue-sky plan for a high-flying fleet of self-sufficient aircraft that are one part zeppelin cities and one part hydrogen-generating floating farms. Dubbed Hydrogenase, the algae-producing airborne cities are 100% emission-free and are capable of generating hydrogen gas without consuming land needed for crops or forests. (via High-Flying Algae Airships are Self-Sufficient Airborne Cities | Inhabitat - Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building)