A Momentary Flow

Updating Worldviews one World at a time

First US patient receives cluster headache-stopping facial implant

See on Scoop.it - The future of medicine and health

Although there’s presently no cure for cluster headaches, a new neurostimulator is claimed to help control them. While they may not be quite as well-known as migraines, cluster headaches are even more painful, and can occur several times a day. There’s presently no cure, although a new “neurostimulator” is claimed to help control them. A US clinical trial of the device has just begun, with a test subject recently having had one implanted beneath his cheekbone.

Developed by San Francisco-based Autonomic Technologies Inc (ATI), the “almond-sized” device was inserted through a 2-cm (0.8-in) incision in the recipient’s gum, at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.

Anchored to the skull under the cheekbone, on the side of the face affected by the headaches, the implant works by stimulating the sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG). This is a nerve bundle located behind the nose, and it’s associated with the transmission of the headache pain. Past approaches have included permanently cutting or chemically burning the SPG.

When a patient feels a cluster headache coming on, they place a separate handheld controller against their cheek. It wirelessly activates the neurostimulator, which in turn blocks the pain signals sent via the SPG. The controller is preprogrammed by the patient’s physician, to provide a length and level of stimulation that’s appropriate to their particular condition.


See on gizmag.com
Graphene electronics can be prepared on flexible substrates. Only the gold metal leads are visible in the transparent graphene sensor. Graphene electronics can be prepared on flexible substrates. Only the gold metal leads are visible in the transparent graphene sensor.

txchnologist:

Graphene-Based Artificial Retina Sensor Being Developed

Researchers at Germany’s Technical University of Munich are developing graphene sensors like the ones depicted above to serve as artificial retinas. The atom-thick sheet of linked carbon atoms is being used because it is thin, flexible, stronger than steel, transparent and electrically conductive. 

TUM physicists think that all of these characteristics and graphene’s compatibility with the body make it a strong contender to serve as the interface between a retinal prosthetic that converts light to electric impulses and the optic nerve. A graphene-based sensor could help blind people with healthy nerve tissue see, they say.

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Reblogged from Txchnologist

Your Sushi May Be Getting Smarter - ‘Small data’ technology could finally replace food products’ expiration dates.  - Every year, some 48 million people in the United States get sick from something they ate. And thousands of them die from these foodborne illnesses, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But the food that can make you sickest often doesn’t even look or smell tainted. Simply giving a food an expiration—or use-by—date doesn’t do much to protect people from bacteria like salmonella and e. Coli. After all, it’s not just time that spoils perishables; it’s also temperature. Americans end up throwing away tons of food—thousands of dollars’ worth per grocery store each day, according to one report—in an abundance of caution, and then many of them get sick anyway. One of the key factors contributing to this ongoing public-health problem is the question of which way the data is flowing. The systems we have in place now to track food safety are largely centralized: Huge agencies like the CDC and FDA collect information, track sickness as it’s reported, and disseminate crucial public-safety notices. But what if individual food items had smart labels that gave consumers the information—beyond simple expiration dates—to determine whether something is safe to eat from the moment they pick it up at the store? Thinfilm, for example, makes paper-thin electronic labels that are bendable and rewritable. Its CEO, Davor Sutija, says there’s value in offering more item-by-item information without relying on centralized infrastructure to make sense of it. (via Your Sushi May Be Getting Smarter - The Atlantic)

Your Sushi May Be Getting Smarter
-
‘Small data’ technology could finally replace food products’ expiration dates.
-
Every year, some 48 million people in the United States get sick from something they ate. And thousands of them die from these foodborne illnesses, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But the food that can make you sickest often doesn’t even look or smell tainted. Simply giving a food an expiration—or use-by—date doesn’t do much to protect people from bacteria like salmonella and e. Coli. After all, it’s not just time that spoils perishables; it’s also temperature. Americans end up throwing away tons of food—thousands of dollars’ worth per grocery store each day, according to one report—in an abundance of caution, and then many of them get sick anyway. One of the key factors contributing to this ongoing public-health problem is the question of which way the data is flowing. The systems we have in place now to track food safety are largely centralized: Huge agencies like the CDC and FDA collect information, track sickness as it’s reported, and disseminate crucial public-safety notices. But what if individual food items had smart labels that gave consumers the information—beyond simple expiration dates—to determine whether something is safe to eat from the moment they pick it up at the store? Thinfilm, for example, makes paper-thin electronic labels that are bendable and rewritable. Its CEO, Davor Sutija, says there’s value in offering more item-by-item information without relying on centralized infrastructure to make sense of it. (via Your Sushi May Be Getting Smarter - The Atlantic)

The Internet’s Original Sin - It’s not too late to ditch the ad-based business model and build a better web.  - Ron Carlson’s short story “What We Wanted To Do” takes the form of an apology from a villager who failed to protect his comrades from marauding Visigoths. It begins: What we wanted to do was spill boiling oil onto the heads of our enemies as they attempted to bang down the gates of our village. But as everyone now knows, we had some problems, primarily technical problems, that prevented us from doing what we wanted to do the way we had hoped to do it. What we’re asking for today is another chance. There’s little suspense in the story—the disastrous outcome is obvious from the first paragraph—but it works because of the poignancy of the apology. All of us have screwed up situations in our lives so badly that we’ve been forced to explain our actions by reminding everyone of our good intentions. It’s obvious now that what we did was a fiasco, so let me remind you that what we wanted to do was something brave and noble. The fiasco I want to talk about is the World Wide Web, specifically, the advertising-supported, “free as in beer” constellation of social networks, services, and content that represents so much of the present day web industry. I’ve been thinking of this world, one I’ve worked in for over 20 years, as a fiasco since reading a lecture by Maciej Cegłowski, delivered at the Beyond Tellerrand web design conference. Cegłowski is an important and influential programmer and an enviably talented writer. His talk is a patient explanation of how we’ve ended up with surveillance as the default, if not sole, internet business model. The talk is hilarious and insightful, and poignant precisely for the reasons Carlson’s story is. The internet spies at us at every twist and turn not because Zuckerberg, Brin, and Page are scheming, sinister masterminds, but due to good intentions gone awry. With apologies to Carlson: What we wanted to do was to build a tool that made it easy for everyone, everywhere to share knowledge, opinions, ideas and photos of cute cats. As everyone knows, we had some problems, primarily business model problems, that prevented us from doing what we wanted to do the way we hoped to do it. What we’re asking for today is a conversation about how we could do this better, since we screwed up pretty badly the first time around. (via The Internet’s Original Sin - The Atlantic)

The Internet’s Original Sin
-
It’s not too late to ditch the ad-based business model and build a better web.
-
Ron Carlson’s short story “What We Wanted To Do” takes the form of an apology from a villager who failed to protect his comrades from marauding Visigoths. It begins: What we wanted to do was spill boiling oil onto the heads of our enemies as they attempted to bang down the gates of our village. But as everyone now knows, we had some problems, primarily technical problems, that prevented us from doing what we wanted to do the way we had hoped to do it. What we’re asking for today is another chance. There’s little suspense in the story—the disastrous outcome is obvious from the first paragraph—but it works because of the poignancy of the apology. All of us have screwed up situations in our lives so badly that we’ve been forced to explain our actions by reminding everyone of our good intentions. It’s obvious now that what we did was a fiasco, so let me remind you that what we wanted to do was something brave and noble. The fiasco I want to talk about is the World Wide Web, specifically, the advertising-supported, “free as in beer” constellation of social networks, services, and content that represents so much of the present day web industry. I’ve been thinking of this world, one I’ve worked in for over 20 years, as a fiasco since reading a lecture by Maciej Cegłowski, delivered at the Beyond Tellerrand web design conference. Cegłowski is an important and influential programmer and an enviably talented writer. His talk is a patient explanation of how we’ve ended up with surveillance as the default, if not sole, internet business model. The talk is hilarious and insightful, and poignant precisely for the reasons Carlson’s story is. The internet spies at us at every twist and turn not because Zuckerberg, Brin, and Page are scheming, sinister masterminds, but due to good intentions gone awry. With apologies to Carlson: What we wanted to do was to build a tool that made it easy for everyone, everywhere to share knowledge, opinions, ideas and photos of cute cats. As everyone knows, we had some problems, primarily business model problems, that prevented us from doing what we wanted to do the way we hoped to do it. What we’re asking for today is a conversation about how we could do this better, since we screwed up pretty badly the first time around. (via The Internet’s Original Sin - The Atlantic)

This is what your home on Mars could look like -NASA JPL and Makerbot have announced the winners of their Thingiverse Mars Base challenge to design and 3D print a human habitat for the Red Planet. - Humans living on Mars is a fascinating concept. We already have Mars One looking to establish a Mars colony, and NASA planning manned missions to the Red Planet, with one objective being to assess the feasibility of living there; whether Mars has the resources necessary for human survival, and whether we have the technology to create what we need. While, however, it’s still a distant dream, that hasn’t stopped people from thinking about how we might live if we get there. Recently, NASA and Makerbot held the Mars Base challenge: to design human habitation, using materials either found on Mars or brought from Earth, that could be 3D printed. With 228 submissions on Thingiverse, the competition was fierce — but the three top designs are in, with the first place winner receiving a MakerBot Replicator Desktop 3D printer and spools of MakerBot PLA filament going to second and third. (via This is what your home on Mars could look like - CNET)

This is what your home on Mars could look like
-
NASA JPL and Makerbot have announced the winners of their Thingiverse Mars Base challenge to design and 3D print a human habitat for the Red Planet.
-
Humans living on Mars is a fascinating concept. We already have Mars One looking to establish a Mars colony, and NASA planning manned missions to the Red Planet, with one objective being to assess the feasibility of living there; whether Mars has the resources necessary for human survival, and whether we have the technology to create what we need. While, however, it’s still a distant dream, that hasn’t stopped people from thinking about how we might live if we get there. Recently, NASA and Makerbot held the Mars Base challenge: to design human habitation, using materials either found on Mars or brought from Earth, that could be 3D printed. With 228 submissions on Thingiverse, the competition was fierce — but the three top designs are in, with the first place winner receiving a MakerBot Replicator Desktop 3D printer and spools of MakerBot PLA filament going to second and third. (via This is what your home on Mars could look like - CNET)