A Momentary Flow

Updating Worldviews one World at a time

Herr said this was the first public demonstration of a running gait by powered prosthetics under neural command.

txchnologist:

The Chance To Dance Again

by Michael Keller

We highlighted the TED talk of Hugh Herr a couple of weeks ago. But his work is too important and beautiful to leave to just one post.

The MIT associate professor of media arts and sciences is making prosthetic limbs and exoskeletons that restore function in those who have lost legs from injury or disease. This set of gifs focuses on his team’s BiOM powered ankle and foot prosthesis

"Bionics is not only about making people stronger and faster," he said during the talk. "Our expression, our humanity can be embedded into electromechanics."

To prove his point, Herr and fellow researchers studied dance movement to replace the lower leg that professional dancer Adrianne Haslet-Davis lost after last year’s Boston marathon bombing. He concluded his talk by bringing Haslet-Davis on the stage to perform a bionic rumba. 

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Scientists make first embryo clones from adults.

See on Scoop.it - The future of medicine and health

Scientists for the first time have cloned cells from two adults to create early-stage embryos, and then derived tissue from those embryos that perfectly matched the DNA of the donors.

The experiment represents another advance in the quest to make tissue in the laboratory that could treat a range of maladies, from heart attacks to Alzheimer’s. The study, involving a 35-year-old man and one age 75, was published Thursday in the journal Cell Stem Cell.

The creation of the first early-stage human clones, using infant and fetal cells rather than those from adults, was reported last year. The new experiment, with a few tweaks, confirms that striking and controversial breakthrough and also shows the technique works on mature cells.

"The proportion of diseases you can treat with [lab-made tissue] increases with age. So if you can’t do this with adult cells, it is of limited value," said Robert Lanza, co-author of the study and chief scientific officer at Advanced Cell Technology Inc. ACTC +1.43% of Marlborough, Mass. The study was funded in part by the government of Korea and done at a lab in California.

Such experiments are controversial because when cells are extracted from an early-stage human embryo, it destroys the embryo, which some people believe is equivalent to taking a life.

Scientists for the first time have cloned cells from two adults to create early-stage embryos, and then derived tissue from those embryos that perfectly matched the DNA of the donors.

See on online.wsj.com

prostheticknowledge:

BionicKangaroo

Robotic recreation of the Kangaroo form put together by Festo to demonstrate energy-efficient movement (this was initially announced on April the 1st, but turns out to be real) - video embedded below:

With the BionicKangaroo, Festo has technologically reproduced the unique way a kangaroo moves. Like its natural model, it can recover the energy when jumping, store it and efficiently use it for the next jump.

On the artificial kangaroo, Festo intelligently combines pneumatic and electrical drive technology to produce a highly dynamic system. The stable jump kinematics plus the precise control technology ensure stability when jumping and landing. The consistent lightweight construction facilitates the unique jumping behaviour. The system is controlled by gestures.

More Here

(via alxndrasplace)

Source festo.com

Reblogged from prosthetic knowledge

plllus:

crocodillium:

Kinematics turns any 3D shape into a foldable form for 3D printing.

Kinematics is a system for 4D printing that creates complex, foldable forms composed of articulated modules. Each component is rigid, but in aggregate they behave as a continuous fabric. Though made of many distinct pieces, these designs require no assembly. Instead the hinge mechanisms are 3D printed in-place and work straight out of the machine.

You can make and order (or print!) your own designs using the Kinematics app.

3d

(via logicianmagician)

MAN seems to be entering one of the major crises of his career. His whole future, nay the possibility of his having any future at all, depends on the turn which events may take in the next half-century. It is a commonplace that he is coming into possession of new and dangerous instruments for controlling his environment and his own nature. Perhaps it is less obvious that he is also groping toward a new view of his office in the scheme of
things, and toward a new and racial purpose. Unfortunately he may possibly take too long to learn what it is that he really wants to do with himself.
Before he can gain clear insight, he may lose himself in a vast desert of spiritual aridity, or even blunder into physical self-destruction. Nothing can save him but a new vision, and a consequent new order of sanity, or common sense.

From Last and First Men, by W. Olaf Stapledon (1930)

Reblogged from Stuff to feast on

Americans Aren’t Ready for the Future Google and Amazon Want to Build | Business | WIRED

See on Scoop.it - Knowmads, Infocology of the future

A new study out of Pew Research Center shows how Americans view the future of tech and what they’re not quite ready for.

Americans are hopeful about the future of technology. But don’t release the drones just yet. And forget meat grown in a petri dish.

Pushing new tech on a public that isn’t ready can have real bottom-line consequences.

That’s the takeaway from a new study released by the Pew Research Center looking at how U.S. residents felt about possible high-tech advances looming in the not-too-distant future. Overall, a decisive majority of those surveyed believed new tech would make the future better. At the same time, the public doesn’t seem quite ready for many of the advances companies like Google and Amazon are pushing hard to make real.

If the stigma surrounding Google Glass (or, perhaps more specifically, “Glassholes”) has taught us anything, it’s that no matter how revolutionary technology may be, ultimately its success or failure ride on public perception. Many promising technological developments have died because they were ahead of their times. During a cultural moment when the alleged arrogance of some tech companies is creating a serious image problem, the risk of pushing new tech on a public that isn’t ready could have real bottom-line consequences.


See on wired.com