A Momentary Flow

Updating Worldviews one World at a time

3-D Printed Shoes Generated Using Conway’s Game of Life
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We’ve seen plenty of 3-D printed shoes in our time, and most of them look exactly how you might imagine: Like algorithmically designed shoes made from plastic. There’s a certain roughness to them, which does less to spread the good word of 3-D printing than it does make us wonder, are we actually supposed to wear this stuff? Francis Bitonti is equal parts technologist and fashion designer—a rare blend of different skill sets that’s allowed him to make 3-D printed goods that look more Fashion Week than Maker Faire. He’s the man responsible for Dita Von Teese’s slinky 3-D printed gown and NYC’s squiggly bike racks. He’s made 3-D printed stainless steel belts and some very pretty flatware. His most recent project, developed with Adobe, is in the form of some outrageous-looking shoes. (via 3-D Printed Shoes Generated Using Conway’s Game of Life | WIRED)

3-D Printed Shoes Generated Using Conway’s Game of Life
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We’ve seen plenty of 3-D printed shoes in our time, and most of them look exactly how you might imagine: Like algorithmically designed shoes made from plastic. There’s a certain roughness to them, which does less to spread the good word of 3-D printing than it does make us wonder, are we actually supposed to wear this stuff? Francis Bitonti is equal parts technologist and fashion designer—a rare blend of different skill sets that’s allowed him to make 3-D printed goods that look more Fashion Week than Maker Faire. He’s the man responsible for Dita Von Teese’s slinky 3-D printed gown and NYC’s squiggly bike racks. He’s made 3-D printed stainless steel belts and some very pretty flatware. His most recent project, developed with Adobe, is in the form of some outrageous-looking shoes. (via 3-D Printed Shoes Generated Using Conway’s Game of Life | WIRED)

Romans Used Nanotechnology to Turn Lycurgus Cup From Green to Red 1,600 Years Ago
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Cambridge University researchers have succeeded in mimicking nanotechnology used by ancient Romans to make a 4th century AD glass cage chalice change colour in different lights. Using the same process, they have made a breakthrough that could greatly increase the storage capabilities of today’s optical devices. 

The Lycurgus Cup, on show at the British Museum, is 1,600 years old and highly prized for its depiction of a scene from the myth of Lycurgus, with the figures from the tale cut out and standing in high relief against a thick glass blank on the vessel.

In addition to the intricate details, the cup is also made out of dichroic, a special type of glass that changes colour when held up to the light. Usually coloured jade green, the cup turns a translucent red when light is shone through it, due to the interaction of light with metallic nanoparticles.

Scientists have figured out over the last 20 years that the interference produced by the interaction between light and nanoparticles can create holograms that go far beyond the usual limits of diffraction, whereby light waves bend or spread when encountering an obstacle or opening.
(via Romans Used Nanotechnology to Turn Lycurgus Cup From Green to Red 1,600 Years Ago)

Romans Used Nanotechnology to Turn Lycurgus Cup From Green to Red 1,600 Years Ago
-
Cambridge University researchers have succeeded in mimicking nanotechnology used by ancient Romans to make a 4th century AD glass cage chalice change colour in different lights. Using the same process, they have made a breakthrough that could greatly increase the storage capabilities of today’s optical devices.

The Lycurgus Cup, on show at the British Museum, is 1,600 years old and highly prized for its depiction of a scene from the myth of Lycurgus, with the figures from the tale cut out and standing in high relief against a thick glass blank on the vessel.

In addition to the intricate details, the cup is also made out of dichroic, a special type of glass that changes colour when held up to the light. Usually coloured jade green, the cup turns a translucent red when light is shone through it, due to the interaction of light with metallic nanoparticles.

Scientists have figured out over the last 20 years that the interference produced by the interaction between light and nanoparticles can create holograms that go far beyond the usual limits of diffraction, whereby light waves bend or spread when encountering an obstacle or opening.
(via Romans Used Nanotechnology to Turn Lycurgus Cup From Green to Red 1,600 Years Ago)

Counterculture giants of the time, like Stewart Brand, Buckminster Fuller and Ivan Illich, championed vernacular tools as a way to give people the personal autonomy and choices they craved. But the consumerist version of this ultimately vision prevailed, such that the decentralized empowerment that networked computers provided has been a mixed bag.

Morozov on the Maker Movement | David Bollier (via johnborthwick)

(via stoweboyd)

Camus achieves with the Myth what the philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty claimed for Montaigne’s Essays: it places “a consciousness astonished at itself at the core of human existence.” For Camus, however, this astonishment results from our confrontation with a world that refuses to surrender meaning. It occurs when our need for meaning shatters against the indifference, immovable and absolute, of the world. As a result, absurdity is not an autonomous state; it does not exist in the world, but is instead exhaled from the abyss that divides us from a mute world.

A Life Worth Living: Albert Camus on Our Search for Meaning and Why Happiness Is Our Moral Obligation | Brain Pickings

The sociologist Zygmunt Bauman neatly summarised the paradox of our era as: “Never have we been so free. Never have we felt so powerless.” We are indeed freer than before, in the sense that we can criticise religion, take advantage of the new laissez-faire attitude to sex and support any political movement we like. We can do all these things because they no longer have any significance – freedom of this kind is prompted by indifference. Yet, on the other hand, our daily lives have become a constant battle against a bureaucracy that would make Kafka weak at the knees. There are regulations about everything, from the salt content of bread to urban poultry-keeping.

Neoliberalism has brought out the worst in us | Paul Verhaeghe | Comment is free | theguardian.com (via futuramb)

(via emergentfutures)

Source theguardian.com

Reblogged from P A Martin Börjesson