A Momentary Flow

Updating Worldviews one World at a time

After spending 3 years at sea and traveling up to 300 kilometers away from home, a rainbow trout can swim straight back to its original hatching ground, following freshwater streams inland and rarely heading in the wrong direction. This remarkable feat of navigation likely relies on many senses; the fish have superb eyesight and smell. But the trout also seem to rely on Earth’s magnetic fields, which point them in the right direction. Now, for the first time in any animal, scientists have isolated magnetic cells in the fish that respond to these fields. The advance may help researchers get to the root of magnetic sensing in a variety of creatures, including birds. “We think this will really be a game changer,” says Michael Winklhofer, an earth scientist at Ludwig Maximilians University Munich in Germany who led the new study. “To study magnetic sensory cells, you have to be able to get hold of them first, and that’s what we’ve finally developed a way to do.” (via A Big Magnet in a Small Fish - ScienceNOW)

After spending 3 years at sea and traveling up to 300 kilometers away from home, a rainbow trout can swim straight back to its original hatching ground, following freshwater streams inland and rarely heading in the wrong direction. This remarkable feat of navigation likely relies on many senses; the fish have superb eyesight and smell. But the trout also seem to rely on Earth’s magnetic fields, which point them in the right direction. Now, for the first time in any animal, scientists have isolated magnetic cells in the fish that respond to these fields. The advance may help researchers get to the root of magnetic sensing in a variety of creatures, including birds. “We think this will really be a game changer,” says Michael Winklhofer, an earth scientist at Ludwig Maximilians University Munich in Germany who led the new study. “To study magnetic sensory cells, you have to be able to get hold of them first, and that’s what we’ve finally developed a way to do.” (via A Big Magnet in a Small Fish - ScienceNOW)