A Momentary Flow

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Carrying a posy of bright flowers, Dorthe Frydenlund strolls through a Roskilde graveyard to honour her father Bent, who died earlier this year. Mrs Frydenlund is among those pioneering a novel way to commemorate the deceased. Nestling amongst the colourful plants and vases is a stone with a chip called a QR (Quick Response) Code. Mrs Frydenlund’s 14-year-old son Nikolai has a smartphone equipped with a free code-reading programme downloaded from the internet for free. Continue reading the main story “Start Quote Code mounted on stone It’s a good way to tell the story of a person and we all have a story” Niels Kristian Nielsen Nikolai reaches down, scans the QR Code with his phone and instantly the screen fills with a photograph of his grandfather, along with a summary of his life. “As a family it means a lot when you are here and feel the need to commemorate Dad,” says Mrs Frydenlund. “It’s not meant as a comfort, more an opportunity for other people to learn his life story. It’s a good way for my son to remember his grandfather.” The QR codes, which cost about 100 euros (£78; $123), are capable of storing audio and video and can help keep the deceased’s legacy alive in a creative way. (via BBC News - Denmark pioneers hi-tech graveyard memorials with QR code)

Carrying a posy of bright flowers, Dorthe Frydenlund strolls through a Roskilde graveyard to honour her father Bent, who died earlier this year. Mrs Frydenlund is among those pioneering a novel way to commemorate the deceased. Nestling amongst the colourful plants and vases is a stone with a chip called a QR (Quick Response) Code. Mrs Frydenlund’s 14-year-old son Nikolai has a smartphone equipped with a free code-reading programme downloaded from the internet for free. Continue reading the main story “Start Quote Code mounted on stone It’s a good way to tell the story of a person and we all have a story” Niels Kristian Nielsen Nikolai reaches down, scans the QR Code with his phone and instantly the screen fills with a photograph of his grandfather, along with a summary of his life. “As a family it means a lot when you are here and feel the need to commemorate Dad,” says Mrs Frydenlund. “It’s not meant as a comfort, more an opportunity for other people to learn his life story. It’s a good way for my son to remember his grandfather.” The QR codes, which cost about 100 euros (£78; $123), are capable of storing audio and video and can help keep the deceased’s legacy alive in a creative way. (via BBC News - Denmark pioneers hi-tech graveyard memorials with QR code)

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