A Momentary Flow

Updating Worldviews one World at a time

Digital caves are a revelation for tourists - and offer respite for ancient historical sites. Jane O’Brien explores how 3D recreations can be even better than the real thing. Atmospheric music greets visitors to Cave 220 - part of the Mogau Grottoes of Dunhuang, an oasis on the ancient Silk Road in China’s Gobi Dessert. A flickering torch offers a tantalising glimpse of the exquisite murals painted by Buddhist monks some 1,400 years ago. And then suddenly, the cavern is ablaze with light, its beauty fully revealed in dazzling colour and extraordinary detail. But this is not a real cave - it’s a virtual environment created by scientists in Hong Kong using technology that has only been available for a few years. The result is so realistic that it might become the only way to ‘see’ endangered historic sites and monuments in the future. “You wouldn’t be able to see any of this in the real cave because light exposure is so damaging,” says Jeffrey Shaw, director of Alive, the Applied Laboratory for Interactive Visualization and Embodiment at the City University of Hong Kong. (via BBC News - Digital Chinese caves preserve history)

Digital caves are a revelation for tourists - and offer respite for ancient historical sites. Jane O’Brien explores how 3D recreations can be even better than the real thing. Atmospheric music greets visitors to Cave 220 - part of the Mogau Grottoes of Dunhuang, an oasis on the ancient Silk Road in China’s Gobi Dessert. A flickering torch offers a tantalising glimpse of the exquisite murals painted by Buddhist monks some 1,400 years ago. And then suddenly, the cavern is ablaze with light, its beauty fully revealed in dazzling colour and extraordinary detail. But this is not a real cave - it’s a virtual environment created by scientists in Hong Kong using technology that has only been available for a few years. The result is so realistic that it might become the only way to ‘see’ endangered historic sites and monuments in the future. “You wouldn’t be able to see any of this in the real cave because light exposure is so damaging,” says Jeffrey Shaw, director of Alive, the Applied Laboratory for Interactive Visualization and Embodiment at the City University of Hong Kong. (via BBC News - Digital Chinese caves preserve history)

Notes

  1. ihavenoideaanymore reblogged this from wildcat2030
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  3. helloalexcl said: Hi Wildcat, I reviewed this exhibit for a Buddhist magazine, examining whether the virtual version could substitute a real pilgrimage des tricycle.com/blog/re…
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  7. robotchallenger reblogged this from wildcat2030 and added:
    My next vacation will be digital.
  8. thedorknesswithin reblogged this from wildcat2030
  9. iamenimlusus reblogged this from wildcat2030 and added:
    Nothing beats the real thing. Sure you get to see it in detail and all, but you don’t get to feel it. And with sites...
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