A Momentary Flow

Updating Worldviews one World at a time

Swarm Theory
The Genius of Swarms
A single ant or bee isn’t smart, but their colonies are. The study of swarm intelligence is providing insights that can help humans manage complex systems, from truck routing to military robots.
I used to think ants knew what they were doing. The ones marching across my kitchen counter looked so confident, I just figured they had a plan, knew where they were going and what needed to be done. How else could ants organize highways, build elaborate nests, stage epic raids, and do all the other things ants do?
Turns out I was wrong. Ants aren’t clever little engineers, architects, or warriors after all—at least not as individuals. When it comes to deciding what to do next, most ants don’t have a clue. “If you watch an ant try to accomplish something, you’ll be impressed by how inept it is,” says Deborah M. Gordon, a biologist at Stanford University.
How do we explain, then, the success of Earth’s 12,000 or so known ant species? They must have learned something in 140 million years.
"Ants aren’t smart," Gordon says. "Ant colonies are." A colony can solve problems unthinkable for individual ants, such as finding the shortest path to the best food source, allocating workers to different tasks, or defending a territory from neighbors. As individuals, ants might be tiny dummies, but as colonies they respond quickly and effectively to their environment. They do it with something called swarm intelligence. (via Swarm Theory - National Geographic Magazine)

Swarm Theory

The Genius of Swarms

A single ant or bee isn’t smart, but their colonies are. The study of swarm intelligence is providing insights that can help humans manage complex systems, from truck routing to military robots.

I used to think ants knew what they were doing. The ones marching across my kitchen counter looked so confident, I just figured they had a plan, knew where they were going and what needed to be done. How else could ants organize highways, build elaborate nests, stage epic raids, and do all the other things ants do?

Turns out I was wrong. Ants aren’t clever little engineers, architects, or warriors after all—at least not as individuals. When it comes to deciding what to do next, most ants don’t have a clue. “If you watch an ant try to accomplish something, you’ll be impressed by how inept it is,” says Deborah M. Gordon, a biologist at Stanford University.

How do we explain, then, the success of Earth’s 12,000 or so known ant species? They must have learned something in 140 million years.

"Ants aren’t smart," Gordon says. "Ant colonies are." A colony can solve problems unthinkable for individual ants, such as finding the shortest path to the best food source, allocating workers to different tasks, or defending a territory from neighbors. As individuals, ants might be tiny dummies, but as colonies they respond quickly and effectively to their environment. They do it with something called swarm intelligence. (via Swarm Theory - National Geographic Magazine)

Notes

  1. subatomicammm reblogged this from wildcat2030
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  3. livetosucceedlivetofly reblogged this from wildcat2030
  4. bloothammer reblogged this from whatjoylikes and added:
    (via TumbleOn)
  5. nonpolarcovalent reblogged this from theolduvaigorge
  6. classy-scorpio reblogged this from arab-soul
  7. whiterabbitblackhare reblogged this from wildcat2030 and added:
    Relevant http://www.nature.com/nsmb/journal/v18/n10/full/nsmb.2119.html
  8. blackboxataris reblogged this from wildcat2030
  9. nonoya reblogged this from logicianmagician and added:
    I think the same thing is true for humans as well. The problem is that we are all divided and too busy with our chores...
  10. void1984 reblogged this from contemplatingmadness
  11. contemplatingmadness reblogged this from logicianmagician
  12. whatjoylikes reblogged this from logicianmagician
  13. logicianmagician reblogged this from wildcat2030 and added:
    I almost feel like the opposite is true for humans. ~_~
  14. bonniemaihi reblogged this from wildcat2030
  15. chuckwearschucks reblogged this from abyr03
  16. empathy-vs-apathy-nyc reblogged this from honor-not-honors
  17. sciphilosopher reblogged this from wildcat2030
  18. achilles101 reblogged this from wildcat2030
  19. emilyelehman reblogged this from wildcat2030
  20. sabelmouse reblogged this from www-outerspacepi
  21. jdeluccia reblogged this from wildcat2030 and added:
    Applicable to #infosec and biz on so many levels.
  22. abyr03 reblogged this from wildcat2030