Join our Mailing List
body { -webkit-animation-delay: 0.1s; -webkit-animation-name: fontfix; -webkit-animation-duration: 0.1s; -webkit-animation-iteration-count: 1; -webkit-animation-timing-function: linear; } @-webkit-keyframes fontfix { from { opacity: 1; } to { opacity: 1; } } /* ]]> */

A Momentary Flow

Evolving Worldviews

Scientists create transistor-like biological device
-
Stanford researchers demonstrate ‘transcriptors’ inside E coli bacteria, in advance in synthetic biology
-
Scientists have used biological tissue to recreate one of the main components of a modern computer inside living cells.
The biological device behaves like a transistor, one of the tiny switches that are etched on to microchips in the billions to perform computer calculations.
The researchers demonstrated the device inside E coli bacteria, one of the most common bugs used in genetic engineering. The work marks one of the latest advances in the growing field of synthetic biology, which recasts biology as a toolset for engineers.
Writing in the journal Science, researchers at Stanford University explain how their biological transistors could be connected together inside living cells to perform computing jobs such as controlling how genes are expressed in an organism.
Led by Drew Endy, a pioneer in the field, the team showed that different arrangements of biological transistors worked like logic gates, which take input signals and process them into different outputs. In keeping with their heritage, Endy calls these arrangements Boolean Integrase Logic (BIL) gates.
Normal transistors control the flow of electrons along metal wires. In the biological device, dubbed a “transcriptor”, the wire is a strand of DNA and the electrons are replaced by an enzyme. A modern computer chip holds several billion transistors that are wired together to carry out calculations. The same can be achieved with transcriptors, each of which is built from about 150 letters of the genetic code. (via Scientists create transistor-like biological device | Science | The Guardian)

Scientists create transistor-like biological device

-

Stanford researchers demonstrate ‘transcriptors’ inside E coli bacteria, in advance in synthetic biology

-

Scientists have used biological tissue to recreate one of the main components of a modern computer inside living cells.

The biological device behaves like a transistor, one of the tiny switches that are etched on to microchips in the billions to perform computer calculations.

The researchers demonstrated the device inside E coli bacteria, one of the most common bugs used in genetic engineering. The work marks one of the latest advances in the growing field of synthetic biology, which recasts biology as a toolset for engineers.

Writing in the journal Science, researchers at Stanford University explain how their biological transistors could be connected together inside living cells to perform computing jobs such as controlling how genes are expressed in an organism.

Led by Drew Endy, a pioneer in the field, the team showed that different arrangements of biological transistors worked like logic gates, which take input signals and process them into different outputs. In keeping with their heritage, Endy calls these arrangements Boolean Integrase Logic (BIL) gates.

Normal transistors control the flow of electrons along metal wires. In the biological device, dubbed a “transcriptor”, the wire is a strand of DNA and the electrons are replaced by an enzyme. A modern computer chip holds several billion transistors that are wired together to carry out calculations. The same can be achieved with transcriptors, each of which is built from about 150 letters of the genetic code. (via Scientists create transistor-like biological device | Science | The Guardian)

Notes

  1. dermoosealini reblogged this from grinderbot
  2. republicofideas reblogged this from wildcat2030
  3. lailanihikari reblogged this from wildcat2030
  4. little-tika reblogged this from wildcat2030
  5. underneaththetreeswewatchthesky reblogged this from wildcat2030
  6. shiftymctwizz reblogged this from wildcat2030
  7. jacquelinemoleski reblogged this from wildcat2030 and added:
    There are several fascinating things about this article. First, I misread “transistors” as “translators” so my first...
  8. carllozano10 reblogged this from wildcat2030
  9. magik7 reblogged this from wildcat2030
  10. jesswindance reblogged this from wildcat2030
  11. toastheaven reblogged this from unclewhisky
  12. unclewhisky reblogged this from grinderbot
  13. grinderbot reblogged this from wildcat2030
  14. the-electric-boogaloo reblogged this from wildcat2030
  15. laikas-owner reblogged this from wildcat2030
  16. jamiem1995 reblogged this from wildcat2030
  17. qualifiedwannabedesigner reblogged this from wildcat2030
  18. radon-t reblogged this from wildcat2030
  19. renatostoteles reblogged this from wildcat2030
  20. psdkfz reblogged this from wildcat2030
  21. 6ti9 reblogged this from wildcat2030
  22. beyond-the-sociopath reblogged this from wildcat2030