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A Momentary Flow

Evolving Worldviews

What is an itch? Scientists have speculated that it is a mild manifestation of pain or perhaps a malfunction of overly sensitive nerve endings stuck in a feedback loop. They have even wondered whether itching is mostly psychological (just think about bed bugs for a minute). Now a study rules out these possibilities by succeeding where past attempts have failed: a group of neuroscientists have finally isolated a unique type of nerve cell that makes us itch and only itch.
In previous research, neuroscientists Liang Han and Xinzhong Dong of Johns Hopkins University and their colleagues determined that some sensory neurons with nerve endings in the skin have a unique protein receptor on them called MrgprA3. They observed under a microscope that chemicals known to create itching caused these neurons to generate electrical signals but that painful stimuli such as hot water or capsaicin, the potent substance in hot peppers, did not. (via Scientists Identify Neurons That Register Itch: Scientific American)

What is an itch? Scientists have speculated that it is a mild manifestation of pain or perhaps a malfunction of overly sensitive nerve endings stuck in a feedback loop. They have even wondered whether itching is mostly psychological (just think about bed bugs for a minute). Now a study rules out these possibilities by succeeding where past attempts have failed: a group of neuroscientists have finally isolated a unique type of nerve cell that makes us itch and only itch.

In previous research, neuroscientists Liang Han and Xinzhong Dong of Johns Hopkins University and their colleagues determined that some sensory neurons with nerve endings in the skin have a unique protein receptor on them called MrgprA3. They observed under a microscope that chemicals known to create itching caused these neurons to generate electrical signals but that painful stimuli such as hot water or capsaicin, the potent substance in hot peppers, did not. (via Scientists Identify Neurons That Register Itch: Scientific American)

Notes

  1. cyenn reblogged this from wildcat2030
  2. selectivelydeaf reblogged this from wildcat2030
  3. erikaschene reblogged this from wildcat2030
  4. open-yourthirdeye reblogged this from science-isinteresting
  5. philosophizewithhim reblogged this from ontopofyou
  6. ontopofyou reblogged this from science-isinteresting
  7. isitapotato reblogged this from acting-captain-irrayditation
  8. jeromethatguy reblogged this from wildcat2030
  9. demonikangel1037 reblogged this from wildcat2030
  10. acting-captain-irrayditation reblogged this from pumpkinskull and added:
    i’m going to have to agree to disagree about the water part. water definitely makes me itch a little.
  11. pthalocy reblogged this from homosexyautomaton and added:
    Oooh, I have been hearing this question tossed about for some time. Hooray!
  12. thatstheendofthat reblogged this from wildcat2030
  13. pumpkinskull reblogged this from quantumscoot and added:
    so what’s that gonna be, irritoception?
  14. my-jumbled-thoughts reblogged this from wildcat2030
  15. leo-fcuks reblogged this from wildcat2030
  16. the-electric-boogaloo reblogged this from wildcat2030
  17. wrongwhole reblogged this from effin-n-jeffin and added:
    i remember googling about itches last year & it turned into a full blown self conducted study & investigation of...