A Momentary Flow

Updating Worldviews one World at a time

Two humans - one Norwegian and one Indian - have been competing for the World Chess Championship. Neither of them would fancy their chances against the best computers. The machines have come a long way and their progress has taken us closer to achieving artificial intelligence.
In 1968 chess master David Levy made a bet that by 1978 no computer could beat him in a series of games. He won the bet. In fact, it took most of the 1980s before he was finally beaten. “After I won the first bout, I made a second bet for a period of five years. I stopped betting after that. At that point I could see what was coming.” In 1997, the best player in the world Garry Kasparov was beaten by the IBM computer Deep Blue in a controversial series. Today, the world’s best player Magnus Carlsen would be foolish to make a Levy-style bet. The best computers would beat him. But the progress that computers have made against one task - beating the best humans at chess - offers a lesson for the whole way people think about the future of artificial intelligence. (via BBC News - The unwinnable game)

Two humans - one Norwegian and one Indian - have been competing for the World Chess Championship. Neither of them would fancy their chances against the best computers. The machines have come a long way and their progress has taken us closer to achieving artificial intelligence.

In 1968 chess master David Levy made a bet that by 1978 no computer could beat him in a series of games. He won the bet. In fact, it took most of the 1980s before he was finally beaten. “After I won the first bout, I made a second bet for a period of five years. I stopped betting after that. At that point I could see what was coming.” In 1997, the best player in the world Garry Kasparov was beaten by the IBM computer Deep Blue in a controversial series. Today, the world’s best player Magnus Carlsen would be foolish to make a Levy-style bet. The best computers would beat him. But the progress that computers have made against one task - beating the best humans at chess - offers a lesson for the whole way people think about the future of artificial intelligence. (via BBC News - The unwinnable game)

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