A Momentary Flow

Updating Worldviews one World at a time

read of the day: A Fundamental Theory to Model the Mind - In 1999, the Danish physicist Per Bak proclaimed to a group of neuroscientists that it had taken him only 10 minutes to determine where the field had gone wrong. Perhaps the brain was less complicated than they thought, he said. Perhaps, he said, the brain worked on the same fundamental principles as a simple sand pile, in which avalanches of various sizes help keep the entire system stable overall — a process he dubbed “self-organized criticality.” As much as scientists in other fields adore outspoken, know-it-all physicists, Bak’s audacious idea — that the brain’s ordered complexity and thinking ability arise spontaneously from the disordered electrical activity of neurons — did not meet with immediate acceptance. But over time, in fits and starts, Bak’s radical argument has grown into a legitimate scientific discipline. Now, about 150 scientists worldwide investigate so-called “critical” phenomena in the brain, the topic of at least three focused workshops in 2013 alone. Add the ongoing efforts to found a journal devoted to such studies, and you have all the hallmarks of a field moving from the fringes of disciplinary boundaries to the mainstream.
continue reading..
(via Toward a Theory of Self-Organized Criticality in the Brain | Simons Foundation)

read of the day: A Fundamental Theory to Model the Mind
-
In 1999, the Danish physicist Per Bak proclaimed to a group of neuroscientists that it had taken him only 10 minutes to determine where the field had gone wrong. Perhaps the brain was less complicated than they thought, he said. Perhaps, he said, the brain worked on the same fundamental principles as a simple sand pile, in which avalanches of various sizes help keep the entire system stable overall — a process he dubbed “self-organized criticality.” As much as scientists in other fields adore outspoken, know-it-all physicists, Bak’s audacious idea — that the brain’s ordered complexity and thinking ability arise spontaneously from the disordered electrical activity of neurons — did not meet with immediate acceptance. But over time, in fits and starts, Bak’s radical argument has grown into a legitimate scientific discipline. Now, about 150 scientists worldwide investigate so-called “critical” phenomena in the brain, the topic of at least three focused workshops in 2013 alone. Add the ongoing efforts to found a journal devoted to such studies, and you have all the hallmarks of a field moving from the fringes of disciplinary boundaries to the mainstream.

continue reading..

(via Toward a Theory of Self-Organized Criticality in the Brain | Simons Foundation)

Notes

  1. alaskahoodies reblogged this from wildcat2030
  2. openstateofmiind reblogged this from wildcat2030
  3. neutrophil reblogged this from wildcat2030
  4. o-a-f reblogged this from euphues
  5. testofeye reblogged this from wildcat2030
  6. hedoniistic reblogged this from euphues
  7. thedrawingzombie reblogged this from wildcat2030
  8. stochastastic reblogged this from wildcat2030
  9. nizdawg reblogged this from wildcat2030
  10. tgckc reblogged this from euphues
  11. acrid-sentient reblogged this from wildcat2030
  12. bubblewrench reblogged this from wildcat2030
  13. bozonkwark reblogged this from wildcat2030
  14. techmattersyes reblogged this from wildcat2030
  15. achildofsundays reblogged this from wildcat2030
  16. miaokuancha reblogged this from wildcat2030
  17. fullstopfictionwriting reblogged this from buffleheadcabin
  18. buffleheadcabin reblogged this from wildcat2030
  19. f4itheist reblogged this from wildcat2030
  20. glamou--r reblogged this from wildcat2030
  21. splendorinthetrash reblogged this from wildcat2030 and added:
    I think looking for the simple,common sense solutions or explanations first is a good idea.