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A Momentary Flow

Evolving Worldviews

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91 posts tagged Ai

The rise of the thinking machines
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At the intersection of Big Data and artificial intelligence computers are quickly beginning to rival the decision making power of humans. While the technology has the capacity to offer vast improvements in precision and efficiency it also raises questions about how much responsibility should be ceded to machines and what humans’ role will be in the future workplace. (via The rise of the thinking machines - E & T Magazine)

The rise of the thinking machines
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At the intersection of Big Data and artificial intelligence computers are quickly beginning to rival the decision making power of humans. While the technology has the capacity to offer vast improvements in precision and efficiency it also raises questions about how much responsibility should be ceded to machines and what humans’ role will be in the future workplace. (via The rise of the thinking machines - E & T Magazine)

It’s time to build a bionic brain for smarter research - The structure of the brain reveals a network of massively interconnected electrochemically active cells. It is known that information can be represented by changes of state within this network, but that statement falls far short of revealing how the brain supports thought, feelings, memory, intention and action. How then to solve this problem? The physicist Richard Feynmann famously said “What I cannot create, I do not understand”. A report published today by the Australian Academy of Science proposes applying this approach to the study of the brain by creating a simulating the biological thought process within a new computer system. In short: build a bionic brain. The device could be truly revolutionary. A bionic brain built on biological principles could suggest entirely new approaches to artificial intelligence. It would be a new computer resource inspiring new solutions for fail-safe smart machines. Simulating thought in a bionic brain would also provide a whole new tool with which to investigate the operation of neural circuits. A bionic brain would provide a whole new approach to the study of not just normal mental function, but also mental disorder such as psychosis, addiction and anxiety. It would provide a new resource to examine the causes of these disorders and even test proposed therapies. Ultimately a bionic brain may even provide a solution for victims of brain damage or stroke by outsourcing some aspects of brain function to a prosthetic device. (via It’s time to build a bionic brain for smarter research)

It’s time to build a bionic brain for smarter research
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The structure of the brain reveals a network of massively interconnected electrochemically active cells. It is known that information can be represented by changes of state within this network, but that statement falls far short of revealing how the brain supports thought, feelings, memory, intention and action. How then to solve this problem? The physicist Richard Feynmann famously said “What I cannot create, I do not understand”. A report published today by the Australian Academy of Science proposes applying this approach to the study of the brain by creating a simulating the biological thought process within a new computer system. In short: build a bionic brain. The device could be truly revolutionary. A bionic brain built on biological principles could suggest entirely new approaches to artificial intelligence. It would be a new computer resource inspiring new solutions for fail-safe smart machines. Simulating thought in a bionic brain would also provide a whole new tool with which to investigate the operation of neural circuits. A bionic brain would provide a whole new approach to the study of not just normal mental function, but also mental disorder such as psychosis, addiction and anxiety. It would provide a new resource to examine the causes of these disorders and even test proposed therapies. Ultimately a bionic brain may even provide a solution for victims of brain damage or stroke by outsourcing some aspects of brain function to a prosthetic device. (via It’s time to build a bionic brain for smarter research)

Artificial intelligence: How to turn Siri into Samantha - “Siri, why do you struggle with conversations?”
“I don’t know what you mean - how about a web search for it?”
If you want the latest football scores, to add meetings to your calendar or launch an app, today’s virtual assistants are relatively good at understanding your voice and doing what’s asked. But try to have the type of natural conversation seen in sci-fi movies featuring artificial intelligence systems - from HAL in 2001 to the sultry-voiced operating system Samantha in Spike Jonze’s Her - and you’ll find your device about as smart as a waterproof teabag. “Google and Apple are painfully aware that their systems are not getting better fast enough because right now Siri and Google Now and the other personal assistant type applications are all programmed by hand,” says Steve Young, professor of information engineering at the University of Cambridge. “If you speak to Siri about baseball it seems relatively intelligent, but if you ask it something much less common it doesn’t really do anything except for a web search. “That’s an indication that the programmers have been busy trying to anticipate what people want to ask about baseball but haven’t thought about people who ask about, for example, GPU chips because you don’t get many queries about that.” (via BBC News - Artificial intelligence: How to turn Siri into Samantha)

Artificial intelligence: How to turn Siri into Samantha
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“Siri, why do you struggle with conversations?”

“I don’t know what you mean - how about a web search for it?”

If you want the latest football scores, to add meetings to your calendar or launch an app, today’s virtual assistants are relatively good at understanding your voice and doing what’s asked. But try to have the type of natural conversation seen in sci-fi movies featuring artificial intelligence systems - from HAL in 2001 to the sultry-voiced operating system Samantha in Spike Jonze’s Her - and you’ll find your device about as smart as a waterproof teabag. “Google and Apple are painfully aware that their systems are not getting better fast enough because right now Siri and Google Now and the other personal assistant type applications are all programmed by hand,” says Steve Young, professor of information engineering at the University of Cambridge. “If you speak to Siri about baseball it seems relatively intelligent, but if you ask it something much less common it doesn’t really do anything except for a web search. “That’s an indication that the programmers have been busy trying to anticipate what people want to ask about baseball but haven’t thought about people who ask about, for example, GPU chips because you don’t get many queries about that.” (via BBC News - Artificial intelligence: How to turn Siri into Samantha)

Source BBC

Supercomputer Takes 40 Minutes To Model 1 Second of Brain Activity
Despite rumors, the singularity, or point at which artificial intelligence can overtake human smarts, still isn’t quite here. One of the world’s most powerful supercomputers is still no match for the humble human brain, taking 40 minutes to replicate a single second of brain activity. Researchers in Germany and Japan used K, the fourth-most powerful supercomputer in the world, to simulate brain activity. With more than 700,000 processor cores and 1.4 million gigabytes of RAM, K simulated the interplay of 1.73 billion nerve cells and more than 10 trillion synapses, or junctions between brain cells. Though that may sound like a lot of brain cells and connections, it represents just 1 percent of the human brain’s network. The long-term goal is to make computing so fast that it can simulate the mind— brain cell by brain cell— in real-time. That may be feasible by the end of the decade, researcher Markus Diesmann, of the University of Freiburg, told the Telegraph. (via Supercomputer Takes 40 Minutes To Model 1 Second of Brain Activity | LiveScience)

Supercomputer Takes 40 Minutes To Model 1 Second of Brain Activity

Despite rumors, the singularity, or point at which artificial intelligence can overtake human smarts, still isn’t quite here. One of the world’s most powerful supercomputers is still no match for the humble human brain, taking 40 minutes to replicate a single second of brain activity. Researchers in Germany and Japan used K, the fourth-most powerful supercomputer in the world, to simulate brain activity. With more than 700,000 processor cores and 1.4 million gigabytes of RAM, K simulated the interplay of 1.73 billion nerve cells and more than 10 trillion synapses, or junctions between brain cells. Though that may sound like a lot of brain cells and connections, it represents just 1 percent of the human brain’s network. The long-term goal is to make computing so fast that it can simulate the mind— brain cell by brain cell— in real-time. That may be feasible by the end of the decade, researcher Markus Diesmann, of the University of Freiburg, told the Telegraph. (via Supercomputer Takes 40 Minutes To Model 1 Second of Brain Activity | LiveScience)

The age of artificial intelligence is here
Computers can now learn from their mistakes and this will turn the digital world into a new era in 2014, according to the N.Y. Times print edition today. The vision of artificial intelligence is now real. The first commercial version of the new kind of computer chip is scheduled to be released in 2014. Not only can it automate tasks that now require painstaking programming — for example, moving a robot’s arm smoothly and efficiently — but it can also sidestep and even tolerate errors, potentially making the term ‘computer crash’ obsolete. This all relates to the technology that would come when systems are self-aware; systems that perceives their environments and takes actions to maximize their chances of success. The new computing approach, already in use by some large technology companies, is based on the biological nervous system, specifically on how neurons react to stimuli and connect with other neurons to interpret information. It allows computers to absorb new information while carrying out a task, and adjust what they do base on the changing signals. A new generation of artificial intelligence systems will perform some functions that humans do with ease: see, speak, listen, navigate, manipulate and control. That can hold enormous consequences for tasks like facial and speech recognition, navigation and planning; the biometrics age is fast developing facial, iris, and palm sensory recognition and voice characteristics… ‘We’re moving from engineering computing systems to something that has many of the characteristics of biological computing,’ said Larry Smarr, an astrophysicist who directs the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, one of many research centers devoted to developing these new kinds of computer circuits. (via The age of artificial intelligence is here - San Diego Technology | Examiner.com)

The age of artificial intelligence is here

Computers can now learn from their mistakes and this will turn the digital world into a new era in 2014, according to the N.Y. Times print edition today. The vision of artificial intelligence is now real. The first commercial version of the new kind of computer chip is scheduled to be released in 2014. Not only can it automate tasks that now require painstaking programming — for example, moving a robot’s arm smoothly and efficiently — but it can also sidestep and even tolerate errors, potentially making the term ‘computer crash’ obsolete. This all relates to the technology that would come when systems are self-aware; systems that perceives their environments and takes actions to maximize their chances of success. The new computing approach, already in use by some large technology companies, is based on the biological nervous system, specifically on how neurons react to stimuli and connect with other neurons to interpret information. It allows computers to absorb new information while carrying out a task, and adjust what they do base on the changing signals. A new generation of artificial intelligence systems will perform some functions that humans do with ease: see, speak, listen, navigate, manipulate and control. That can hold enormous consequences for tasks like facial and speech recognition, navigation and planning; the biometrics age is fast developing facial, iris, and palm sensory recognition and voice characteristics… ‘We’re moving from engineering computing systems to something that has many of the characteristics of biological computing,’ said Larry Smarr, an astrophysicist who directs the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, one of many research centers devoted to developing these new kinds of computer circuits. (via The age of artificial intelligence is here - San Diego Technology | Examiner.com)

The essential truth behind subsymbolism is that language and behavior exist in relation to an environment, not in a vacuum, and they gain meaning from their usage in that environment. To use language is to use it for some purpose. To behave is to behave for some end. In this view, any attempt to generate a universal set of rules will always be riddled with exceptions, because contexts are constantly shifting. Without the drive toward concrete environmental goals, representation of knowledge in a computer is meaningless, and fruitless. It remains locked in the realm of data.

A.I. Has Grown Up and Left Home - Issue 8: Home - Nautilus