A Momentary Flow

Updating Worldviews one World at a time

When the Large Hadron Collider went online in 2009, most scientists saw it as an unprecedented opportunity to conduct experiments involving the building blocks of the physical world. But to Stanislav Shalunov, a networking engineer, it looked like a whole new kind of Big Data problem.
A few years before the LHC went live, Shalunov worked on Internet 2, an experimental network that connects universities and research organizations. Given the amount of data the Collider would be spitting out — about 10 Gigabits per second, to 70 academic institutions — he knew that the LHC it was likely to clog up the Internet 2 network. So Shalunov developed a networking protocol designed to relieve the congestion that was sure to come. “This was an amount of traffic that neither the networks nor the transport protocols at the time were really prepared to cope with,” Shalunov remembers.
He didn’t realize it at the time, but by solving the Large Hadron Collider data-pumping problem, Shalunov also was helping fix a big problem for peer-to-peer networks. By the time scientists at CERN flipped the switch on the LHC, Shalunov was working for BitTorrent on its popular peer-to-peer file-sharing service. The work he started at Internet 2 and finished at BitTorrent eventually was rolled into an internet standard called the Low Extra Delay Background Transport. (via How the Large Hadron Collider Will Bring the Internet to Everything | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com)

When the Large Hadron Collider went online in 2009, most scientists saw it as an unprecedented opportunity to conduct experiments involving the building blocks of the physical world. But to Stanislav Shalunov, a networking engineer, it looked like a whole new kind of Big Data problem.

A few years before the LHC went live, Shalunov worked on Internet 2, an experimental network that connects universities and research organizations. Given the amount of data the Collider would be spitting out — about 10 Gigabits per second, to 70 academic institutions — he knew that the LHC it was likely to clog up the Internet 2 network. So Shalunov developed a networking protocol designed to relieve the congestion that was sure to come. “This was an amount of traffic that neither the networks nor the transport protocols at the time were really prepared to cope with,” Shalunov remembers.

He didn’t realize it at the time, but by solving the Large Hadron Collider data-pumping problem, Shalunov also was helping fix a big problem for peer-to-peer networks. By the time scientists at CERN flipped the switch on the LHC, Shalunov was working for BitTorrent on its popular peer-to-peer file-sharing service. The work he started at Internet 2 and finished at BitTorrent eventually was rolled into an internet standard called the Low Extra Delay Background Transport. (via How the Large Hadron Collider Will Bring the Internet to Everything | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com)

Chipmaker Freescale Semiconductor has created the world’s smallest ARM-powered chip, designed to push the world of connected devices into surprising places. Announced today, the Kinetis KL02 measures just 1.9 by 2 millimeters. It’s a full microcontroller unit (MCU), meaning the chip sports a processor, RAM, ROM, clock and I/O control unit — everything a body needs to be a basic tiny computer. The KL02 has 32k of flash memory, 4k of RAM, a 32 bit processor, and peripherals like a 12-bit analog to digital converter and a low-power UART built into the chip. By including these extra parts, device makers can shrink down their designs, resulting in tiny boards in tiny devices. How tiny? One application that Freescale says the chips could be used for is swallowable computers. Yes, you read that right. “We are working with our customers and partners on providing technology for their products that can be swallowed but we can’t really comment on unannounced products,” says Steve Tateosian, global product marketing manager. The KL02 is part of Freescale’s push to make chips tailored to the Internet of Things. Between the onboard peripherals and a power-management system tuned to the chemistry of current generation batteries, the KL02 is intended to be at the heart of a network of connected objects, moving from shoes that wirelessly report your steps (a natural evolution of Nike ) to pipes that warn you when they are leaking. (via Freescale’s Insanely Tiny ARM Chip Will Put the Internet of Things Inside Your Body | Wired Design | Wired.com)

Chipmaker Freescale Semiconductor has created the world’s smallest ARM-powered chip, designed to push the world of connected devices into surprising places. Announced today, the Kinetis KL02 measures just 1.9 by 2 millimeters. It’s a full microcontroller unit (MCU), meaning the chip sports a processor, RAM, ROM, clock and I/O control unit — everything a body needs to be a basic tiny computer. The KL02 has 32k of flash memory, 4k of RAM, a 32 bit processor, and peripherals like a 12-bit analog to digital converter and a low-power UART built into the chip. By including these extra parts, device makers can shrink down their designs, resulting in tiny boards in tiny devices. How tiny? One application that Freescale says the chips could be used for is swallowable computers. Yes, you read that right. “We are working with our customers and partners on providing technology for their products that can be swallowed but we can’t really comment on unannounced products,” says Steve Tateosian, global product marketing manager. The KL02 is part of Freescale’s push to make chips tailored to the Internet of Things. Between the onboard peripherals and a power-management system tuned to the chemistry of current generation batteries, the KL02 is intended to be at the heart of a network of connected objects, moving from shoes that wirelessly report your steps (a natural evolution of Nike ) to pipes that warn you when they are leaking. (via Freescale’s Insanely Tiny ARM Chip Will Put the Internet of Things Inside Your Body | Wired Design | Wired.com)

The internet of things will allow the products we buy to act as social objects with their own virtual Facebook profile equivalent, around which new experiences can cluster, according to Andy Hobsbawm, founder and chief marketing officer of Evrythng. Speaking at the Economist’s Technology Frontiers conference, he explained that machine-to-machine interactions such as tweeting fridges tended to get a lot of attention, but that his company was particularly interested in the “people and machines stuff”. (via A ‘Facebook of things’ could give appliances their own social presence (Wired UK))

The internet of things will allow the products we buy to act as social objects with their own virtual Facebook profile equivalent, around which new experiences can cluster, according to Andy Hobsbawm, founder and chief marketing officer of Evrythng. Speaking at the Economist’s Technology Frontiers conference, he explained that machine-to-machine interactions such as tweeting fridges tended to get a lot of attention, but that his company was particularly interested in the “people and machines stuff”. (via A ‘Facebook of things’ could give appliances their own social presence (Wired UK))