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A Momentary Flow

Evolving Worldviews

The Cubli: a cube that can jump up, balance, and ‘walk’

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The Cubli is a 15 × 15 × 15 cm cube that can jump up and balance on its corner. Reaction wheels mounted on three faces of the cube rotate at high angular velocities and then brake suddenly, causing the Cubli to jump up. Once the Cubli has almost reached the corner stand up position, controlled motor torques are applied to make it balance on its corner. In addition to balancing, the motor torques can also be used to achieve a controlled fall such that the Cubli can be commanded to fall in any arbitrary direction. Combining these three abilities — jumping up, balancing, and controlled falling — the Cubli is able to ‘walk’.

Lead Researchers: Gajamohan Mohanarajah and Raffaello D’Andrea

(by Gajamohan Mohanarajah)

NASA unveils 6-foot ‘superhero robot’ Valkyrie
Designed to compete in the DARPA Robotics Challenge, this “female” robot could be the precursor to robo-astronauts that will help colonize Mars.
What if NASA’s Robonaut grew legs and indulged in steroids? The result might be close to what NASA has unveiled: Valkyrie is a humanoid machine billed as a “superhero robot.” Developed at the Johnson Space Center, Valkyrie is a 6.2-foot, 275-pound hulk designed to compete in the DARPA Robotics Challenge (DRC). It will go toe to toe with the Terminator-like Atlas robot from Boston Dynamics in what’s shaping up to be an amazing modern-day duel. In an interesting twist, Valkyrie seems to be a girl. While officially genderless, “Valkyrie” (a nickname, since the official designation is R5) evokes the goddess-like females of Norse myth. (via NASA unveils 6-foot ‘superhero robot’ Valkyrie | Crave - CNET)

NASA unveils 6-foot ‘superhero robot’ Valkyrie

Designed to compete in the DARPA Robotics Challenge, this “female” robot could be the precursor to robo-astronauts that will help colonize Mars.

What if NASA’s Robonaut grew legs and indulged in steroids? The result might be close to what NASA has unveiled: Valkyrie is a humanoid machine billed as a “superhero robot.” Developed at the Johnson Space Center, Valkyrie is a 6.2-foot, 275-pound hulk designed to compete in the DARPA Robotics Challenge (DRC). It will go toe to toe with the Terminator-like Atlas robot from Boston Dynamics in what’s shaping up to be an amazing modern-day duel. In an interesting twist, Valkyrie seems to be a girl. While officially genderless, “Valkyrie” (a nickname, since the official designation is R5) evokes the goddess-like females of Norse myth. (via NASA unveils 6-foot ‘superhero robot’ Valkyrie | Crave - CNET)

Inside Adam Savage’s Cave: Awesome Robot Spider!

We’re back in Adam’s cave to check out his latest obsession, a robot spider with incredibly realistic movement. Adam shows off the special box and platform he built to tinker and calibrate the spider, and then sends it crawling around the pool table in his shop. It’s not for the arachnophobic!

Find out more about the Robugtix here: http://www.robugtix.com/

More cool stuff from Adam Savage’s Cave here: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…

(by Tested)

This 6-Foot, 330-Pound Robot May One Day Save Your Life By Jason Kehe
Meet Atlas, the Pentagon’s 6’2”, 330-pound humanitarian robot. He was designed to save lives in disaster zones (like Fukushima). But while this Tin Man has a heart, he lacks a brain. In December, seven teams of scientists from top institutions, including MIT and Virginia Tech, will compete to code the bot for action. Each team will send its own Atlas into Darpa’s trials—eight tasks that will test his ability to navigate degraded terrain, drive a utility vehicle, and enter buildings. “We designed Atlas to facilitate programming, but we expect Darpa to make the com­petition challenging,” says Marc Raibert, president of Boston Dynamics, Atlas’ maker. Here’s the skinny on the massive bot. (via This 6-Foot, 330-Pound Robot May One Day Save Your Life | Danger Room | Wired.com)

This 6-Foot, 330-Pound Robot May One Day Save Your Life By Jason Kehe

Meet Atlas, the Pentagon’s 6’2”, 330-pound humanitarian robot. He was designed to save lives in disaster zones (like Fukushima). But while this Tin Man has a heart, he lacks a brain. In December, seven teams of scientists from top institutions, including MIT and Virginia Tech, will compete to code the bot for action. Each team will send its own Atlas into Darpa’s trials—eight tasks that will test his ability to navigate degraded terrain, drive a utility vehicle, and enter buildings. “We designed Atlas to facilitate programming, but we expect Darpa to make the com­petition challenging,” says Marc Raibert, president of Boston Dynamics, Atlas’ maker. Here’s the skinny on the massive bot. (via This 6-Foot, 330-Pound Robot May One Day Save Your Life | Danger Room | Wired.com)

Source Wired

Giant Fembots Dance With Dinosaurs in the Weirdest Show on Earth

TOKYO — Outside, the city is bracing for the most violent typhoon of the past decade, a storm with winds topping 75 mph that’s already dumping endless sheets of rain from the night sky. Yet it all seems mild compared to what’s happening inside a bunker of a theater two floors below the wind and the rain. You sit in the back row, stuffed into something a lot like a grade-school writing desk, a Bento box and green tea untouched on the tray in front of you. The food is almost inedible — cold rice and fish one step below what you’d find in a Japanese convenience store — but even if it were the finest sushi on Earth, you wouldn’t be eating. It’s hard to eat when watching bikini-clad go-go dancers do mock battle with pseudo-metallic automations from some alternate future universe — not to mention the blaring electronica, flashing lights, giant Fembots, robotic dinosaurs, stuffed panda ninjas, roving Segways, rainbow afro wigs, virtual fireworks, kabuki-style play acting, a Captain America shield, medieval iconography, and a sea of waving glow sticks. (via Giant Fembots Dance With Dinosaurs in the Weirdest Show on Earth | Wired Business | Wired.com)

Superfast rock-paper-scissors robot ‘wins’ every time

A robot developed by Japanese scientists is so fast it can “win” the rock-paper-scissors game against a human every single time.

The Janken robot - named after the game’s Japanese name - is a faster version of one unveiled by University of Tokyo researchers in June 2012. Version two completes its chosen hand shape almost at the same time as the human hand. It uses high-speed recognition and reaction, rather than prediction. Technically, the robot cheats because it reacts extremely quickly to what the human hand is doing rather than making a premeditated simultaneous action as the rules state. Taking just one millisecond (ms) - a thousandth of a second - to recognise what shape the human hand is making, it then chooses a winning move and reacts at high speed. Version one completed its shape 20ms after the human hand; version two finishes almost simultaneously. The scientists at the Ishikawa Oku Laboratory, part of the University of Tokyo, specialise in a range of technologies, including “sensor fusion”, which aims to replicate and improve upon the human senses using high-speed intelligent robots. (via BBC News - Superfast rock-paper-scissors robot ‘wins’ every time)

Robokind Zeno R25 social robot detects and mimics emotions
More and more, robots are moving into our everyday lives, and if they’re not going to end up being incredibly annoying, they’re going to have to learn to recognize and cope with human emotions. RoboKind of Dallas, Texas has started a Kickstarter campaign to raise capital for the further development of its Zeno R25 interactive humanoid robot, which is designed to interact with humans in an intuitive way by detecting and mimicking emotions. (via Robokind Zeno R25 social robot detects and mimics emotions - Images)

Robokind Zeno R25 social robot detects and mimics emotions

More and more, robots are moving into our everyday lives, and if they’re not going to end up being incredibly annoying, they’re going to have to learn to recognize and cope with human emotions. RoboKind of Dallas, Texas has started a Kickstarter campaign to raise capital for the further development of its Zeno R25 interactive humanoid robot, which is designed to interact with humans in an intuitive way by detecting and mimicking emotions. (via Robokind Zeno R25 social robot detects and mimics emotions - Images)

Qualcomm’s brain-inspired chip: Good phone, good robot
This month, chipmaker Qualcomm opened up about its progress and goals in work on a brain-inspired chip architecture. The results are impressive. Computers that can mimic the human brain pose a challenge that attracts many computer scientists. While some people take comfort in the difference between computers and humans, such scientists see the difference as a challenge and ask if the gap can be narrowed. Qualcomm, for one, is working away at a computer architecture modeled after the brain, imitating brain processes. In a recent blog posting, Samir Kumar, Qualcomm director business development, presented his overview of the company’s Zeroth processors, which are brain–inspired. “For the past few years our Research and Development teams have been working on a new computer architecture that breaks the traditional mold. We wanted to create a new computer processor that mimics the human brain and nervous system so devices can have embedded cognition driven by brain inspired computing—this is Qualcomm Zeroth processing.” The company envisions “neuro-inspired” chips for robots, vision systems, brain implants and smartphones that will sense and process information more efficiently than ever before. Qualcomm has been focusing on a class of processors called neural processing units (NPUs). designed to be massively parallel, reprogrammable, and capable of cognitive tasks such as classification and prediction (via Qualcomm’s brain-inspired chip: Good phone, good robot)

Qualcomm’s brain-inspired chip: Good phone, good robot

This month, chipmaker Qualcomm opened up about its progress and goals in work on a brain-inspired chip architecture. The results are impressive. Computers that can mimic the human brain pose a challenge that attracts many computer scientists. While some people take comfort in the difference between computers and humans, such scientists see the difference as a challenge and ask if the gap can be narrowed. Qualcomm, for one, is working away at a computer architecture modeled after the brain, imitating brain processes. In a recent blog posting, Samir Kumar, Qualcomm director business development, presented his overview of the company’s Zeroth processors, which are brain–inspired. “For the past few years our Research and Development teams have been working on a new computer architecture that breaks the traditional mold. We wanted to create a new computer processor that mimics the human brain and nervous system so devices can have embedded cognition driven by brain inspired computing—this is Qualcomm Zeroth processing.” The company envisions “neuro-inspired” chips for robots, vision systems, brain implants and smartphones that will sense and process information more efficiently than ever before. Qualcomm has been focusing on a class of processors called neural processing units (NPUs). designed to be massively parallel, reprogrammable, and capable of cognitive tasks such as classification and prediction (via Qualcomm’s brain-inspired chip: Good phone, good robot)