A Momentary Flow

Updating Worldviews one World at a time

Read of the day…

In the 21st century, the influencing machine has escaped from the shuttered wards of the mental hospital to become a distinctive myth for our times. It is compelling not because we all have schizophrenia, but because reality has become a grey scale between the external world and our imaginations. The world is now mediated in part by technologies that fabricate it and partly by our own minds, whose pattern-recognition routines work ceaselessly to stitch digital illusions into the private cinema of our consciousness. The classical myths of metamorphosis explored the boundaries between humanity and nature and our relationship to the animals and the gods. Likewise, the fantastical technologies that were once the hallmarks of insanity enable us to articulate the possibilities, threats and limits of the tools that are extending our minds into unfamiliar dimensions, both seductive and terrifying.

How reality caught up with paranoid delusions – Mike Jay – Aeon
Are neuromorphic chips helping us replicate the brain?
There is no computer that works as efficiently as the human brain. The scientists’ goals are to build an artificial brain that will work just like the human brain. University of Zurich, Neuroinformatics researchers have made a breakthrough on this goal. They are now understanding how to configure neuromorphic chips that can replicate the brain’s information processing capabilities in real-time. Researchers validate this by creating a synthetic sensory processing system that demonstrates cognitive abilities. Most methods to neuroinformatics are restricted to the progress of neural network replicas on computers that aim to incite complex nerve networks or supercomputers. Only a select few researchers will follow the Zurich researchers’ method to develop electronic circuits that are similar to the brain in terms of size, speed, and energy consumption. A professor at the Institute of Neuroinformatics, Giacomo Indiveri said, “”Our goal is to emulate the properties of biological neurons and synapses directly on microchips.”” (via Are neuromorphic chips helping us replicate the brain?)

Are neuromorphic chips helping us replicate the brain?

There is no computer that works as efficiently as the human brain. The scientists’ goals are to build an artificial brain that will work just like the human brain. University of Zurich, Neuroinformatics researchers have made a breakthrough on this goal. They are now understanding how to configure neuromorphic chips that can replicate the brain’s information processing capabilities in real-time. Researchers validate this by creating a synthetic sensory processing system that demonstrates cognitive abilities. Most methods to neuroinformatics are restricted to the progress of neural network replicas on computers that aim to incite complex nerve networks or supercomputers. Only a select few researchers will follow the Zurich researchers’ method to develop electronic circuits that are similar to the brain in terms of size, speed, and energy consumption. A professor at the Institute of Neuroinformatics, Giacomo Indiveri said, “”Our goal is to emulate the properties of biological neurons and synapses directly on microchips.”” (via Are neuromorphic chips helping us replicate the brain?)

Liquid Air – the future of motoring?
-
Liquid Air could be be a fuel for the future, says Andrew English.
-
Engineers call it disruptive technology, but Liquid Air is much more than that. Using cryogenic atmospheric air at minus 196 degrees Centrigrade as an energy store potentially inverts our idea of the piston engine and subverts the plans of rival energy storage schemes which promote hydrogen or discarded automobile batteries.
Cryogenic air is known technology of course. Nitrogen, which forms 78 per cent of atmospheric air, was first liquefied in 1883 through a process of repeated compression, expansion and heat extraction.
The Liquid Air Company of Boston Massachusetts produced the first cryogenic liquid powered car. Formed in 1899 and in receivership just three years later, the company was a short-lived affair, but the car did run and was demonstrated by its inventor, Hans Knudsen in 1902. Apparently it drove some 40 miles at 12mph, on 15 gallons of liquid air. (via Liquid Air – the future of motoring? - Telegraph)

Liquid Air – the future of motoring?

-

Liquid Air could be be a fuel for the future, says Andrew English.

-

Engineers call it disruptive technology, but Liquid Air is much more than that. Using cryogenic atmospheric air at minus 196 degrees Centrigrade as an energy store potentially inverts our idea of the piston engine and subverts the plans of rival energy storage schemes which promote hydrogen or discarded automobile batteries.

Cryogenic air is known technology of course. Nitrogen, which forms 78 per cent of atmospheric air, was first liquefied in 1883 through a process of repeated compression, expansion and heat extraction.

The Liquid Air Company of Boston Massachusetts produced the first cryogenic liquid powered car. Formed in 1899 and in receivership just three years later, the company was a short-lived affair, but the car did run and was demonstrated by its inventor, Hans Knudsen in 1902. Apparently it drove some 40 miles at 12mph, on 15 gallons of liquid air. (via Liquid Air – the future of motoring? - Telegraph)

A must watch! portraying what the future of tech feels like.. (W)

DJ Fresh & Mindtunes: A track created only by the mind

-

Published on May 29, 2013

Download the track “Mindtunes” here: http://bit.ly/10zvhvi. Proceeds go directly to the Queen Elizabeth’s Foundation for disabled people. Find out more about QEF on http://qef.org.uk/

Mindtunes is a track created by Andy, Jo and Mark, 3 physically disabled music fans, using only one instrument: their mind. The track was produced by DJ Fresh. Watch the music video: http://bit.ly/18tDipD

At Smirnoff we believe there’s a creator in everyone of us. All you need are the means to get it out there, for everyone to see.

You have a mind, you can create. #yoursforthemaking

Special thanks to guest member Matthew.


Made with Emotiv EPOC technology.

(Documentary) (by SmirnoffEurope)

Making good
-
Repairing things is about more than thrift. It is about creating something bold and original
-
The 16th-century Japanese tea master Sen no Rikyū is said to have ignored his host’s fine Song Dynasty Chinese tea jar until the owner smashed it in despair at his indifference. After the shards had been painstakingly reassembled by the man’s friends, Rikyū declared: ‘Now, the piece is magnificent.’ So it went in old Japan: when a treasured bowl fell to the floor, one didn’t just sigh and reach for the glue. The old item was gone, but its fracture created the opportunity to make a new one.
Smashed ceramics would be stuck back together with a strong adhesive made from lacquer and rice glue, the web of cracks emphasised with coloured lacquer. Sometimes, the lacquer was mixed or sprinkled with powdered silver or gold and polished with silk so that the joins gleamed; a bowl or container repaired in this way would typically be valued more highly than the original. According to Christy Bartlett, a contemporary tea master based in San Francisco, it is this ‘gap between the vanity of pristine appearance and the fractured manifestation of mortal fate which deepens its appeal’. The mended object is special precisely because it was worth mending. The repair, like that of an old teddy bear, is a testament to the affection in which the object is held.
Go read..
(via Philip Ball – The art of repair)

Making good

-

Repairing things is about more than thrift. It is about creating something bold and original

-

The 16th-century Japanese tea master Sen no Rikyū is said to have ignored his host’s fine Song Dynasty Chinese tea jar until the owner smashed it in despair at his indifference. After the shards had been painstakingly reassembled by the man’s friends, Rikyū declared: ‘Now, the piece is magnificent.’ So it went in old Japan: when a treasured bowl fell to the floor, one didn’t just sigh and reach for the glue. The old item was gone, but its fracture created the opportunity to make a new one.

Smashed ceramics would be stuck back together with a strong adhesive made from lacquer and rice glue, the web of cracks emphasised with coloured lacquer. Sometimes, the lacquer was mixed or sprinkled with powdered silver or gold and polished with silk so that the joins gleamed; a bowl or container repaired in this way would typically be valued more highly than the original. According to Christy Bartlett, a contemporary tea master based in San Francisco, it is this ‘gap between the vanity of pristine appearance and the fractured manifestation of mortal fate which deepens its appeal’. The mended object is special precisely because it was worth mending. The repair, like that of an old teddy bear, is a testament to the affection in which the object is held.

Go read..

(via Philip Ball – The art of repair)

Rape is one of the most brutal and heinous crimes imaginable. This undergarment is designed to disable the attacker with a powerful electric jolt, while letting the cops know where an attack has occured using GPS coordinates sent by text message. The lingerie was invented by three engineering students at Sri Ramaswamy Memorial University in India, where violence against women has become a major problem. They say that most attacks against women begin with the assailant grabbing the woman around the neck and chest, so the garment protects that area. Pressure sensors trigger a high voltage power supply, which sends 3,800kV pulses through wires embedded in the bust area. A polymer lining protect the wearer from getting a shock themselves, which obviously would defeat the purpose of the garment. At the same time as the attacker is being zapped, a cellular module determines the location of the attack with GPS, then sends to coordinates to the police so they can respond. No word on when the garment may be commercially available, or how much it might cost. (via Rape resistant lingerie zaps the attacker, texts the cops | DVICE)

Rape is one of the most brutal and heinous crimes imaginable. This undergarment is designed to disable the attacker with a powerful electric jolt, while letting the cops know where an attack has occured using GPS coordinates sent by text message. The lingerie was invented by three engineering students at Sri Ramaswamy Memorial University in India, where violence against women has become a major problem. They say that most attacks against women begin with the assailant grabbing the woman around the neck and chest, so the garment protects that area. Pressure sensors trigger a high voltage power supply, which sends 3,800kV pulses through wires embedded in the bust area. A polymer lining protect the wearer from getting a shock themselves, which obviously would defeat the purpose of the garment. At the same time as the attacker is being zapped, a cellular module determines the location of the attack with GPS, then sends to coordinates to the police so they can respond. No word on when the garment may be commercially available, or how much it might cost. (via Rape resistant lingerie zaps the attacker, texts the cops | DVICE)

Technological Darwinism

Just a little op-ed on black market knock-offs and the fluid nature of technology: 

http://notebooknumbernine.wordpress.com/2013/02/20/adaptation/

“More than half the workers of the world do business in the informal, or shadow, economy—selling legal products in a quasi-legal way, or, like the owner of that New York liquor store, selling quasi-legal products in a legal way—and their work is worth more than USD 10 trillion each year. For much of the planet, the global informal economy has become a dynamic and mobile network of ingenuity involving every type of business; from street merchants to mega-corporations…This chain also includes a technological feedback loop. For instance, Chinese firms have started producing phones that fit two SIM cards simultaneously because African customers ask for them.”

—Robert Neuwirth

an interesting read on the adaptation of technology and economy.

Thanks for the submission Michael

We live in an era of scientific triumphalism, when leading researchers in any number of fields claim they are supremely qualified to explain not only how the universe works, but also what it means. Metaphysics, they tell us, can now be considered a subset of physics.
Thus it’s not surprising that distinguished hackles would be raised when a spirited counter-attack is launched by a well-known philosopher who contends that scientists
a) have conveniently ignored gaping holes in their understanding of how evolution has shaped the world and
b) might learn something from the evangelical Christians who promote Intelligent Design.
The philosopher in question is Thomas Nagel, who years ago attracted more than the usual attention accorded philosophy professors with his essay, “What Is It Like to Be a Bat?”
Nagel’s new book, Mind and Cosmos, comes with a subtitle that succinctly describes the epistemological chip he’s placed on his shoulder, daring scientists to knock it off: Why the Materialist Neo-Darwinian Conception of Nature Is Almost Certainly False. (via Erewhon: The 1872 Fantasy Novel that Anticipated Thomas Nagel’s Problems with Darwinism Today - Doug Hill - The Atlantic)

We live in an era of scientific triumphalism, when leading researchers in any number of fields claim they are supremely qualified to explain not only how the universe works, but also what it means. Metaphysics, they tell us, can now be considered a subset of physics.

Thus it’s not surprising that distinguished hackles would be raised when a spirited counter-attack is launched by a well-known philosopher who contends that scientists

a) have conveniently ignored gaping holes in their understanding of how evolution has shaped the world and

b) might learn something from the evangelical Christians who promote Intelligent Design.

The philosopher in question is Thomas Nagel, who years ago attracted more than the usual attention accorded philosophy professors with his essay, “What Is It Like to Be a Bat?”

Nagel’s new book, Mind and Cosmos, comes with a subtitle that succinctly describes the epistemological chip he’s placed on his shoulder, daring scientists to knock it off: Why the Materialist Neo-Darwinian Conception of Nature Is Almost Certainly False. (via Erewhon: The 1872 Fantasy Novel that Anticipated Thomas Nagel’s Problems with Darwinism Today - Doug Hill - The Atlantic)