A Momentary Flow

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125 posts tagged art

Virtual Worlds: Walter Pichler’s Futuristic Visions
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Around forty-five years ago a man wore a submarine-like white helmet that extended from front to back. His entire head disappeared into the futurist capsule; only the title betraying what was happening. TV Helmet created in 1967 is a technical device that isolates the user while imbedding him or her in an endless web of information: closed off against the outside world, the wearer was completely focused on the screen before his eyes. TV Helmet is the work of Walter Pichler and it doesn’t merely formally anticipate the cyber glasses developed decades later; Pichler also articulated questions of content in relation to the media experience long before the “virtual world” was even discovered. Even back then, Walter Pichler was probably already a media critic as he’s remained one to this day. But he is also a conceptually thinking artist who explored space early on—beyond the four walls and the structures of cities. Pichler called his invention a Portable Living Room. His pioneering designs, The Prototypes, are pneumatic plastic living bubbles from the sixties that sought answers to the questions of tomorrow’s individualized life somewhere between the areas of design, architecture, and art. With their reference to space travel and modernist materials, Pichler’s futurist sculptures inspire a desire for the future— even if his messages are said to possess a sceptical or sarcastic undertone. (via Virtual Worlds: Walter Pichler’s Futuristic Visions | artselectronic)

Drone takes light paintings into whole new realm

Light paintings, or long exposure photography if you want to be technically correct, never gets old. Over the years, we’ve seen quite an impressive array of creative light paintings made using different techniques. But this is the first time we’ve seen an artist use a drone to light up the night in such spectacular fashion. Artist and remote-control aviation enthusiast FICTION thought it’d be fun to try to emulate some of the aesthetic from Close Encounters of the Third Kind using a drone. To create his “Close Encounters of the Phantom Kind” homage, FICTION took a DJI Phantom drone, strapped some lights to it, flew it around at night, and then took some long exposure shots. The result: some decent abstract light art. Good, but not great stuff. To turn the ordinary-looking long exposures into something more eye-catching, FICTION imported the shots into Photoshop and mirrored them. As you can see for yourself in the gallery below, the final composites are way more interesting to look at. We know Amazon and the UAE are wetting their pants at the idea of drone delivery systems, but can we get some more drone art guys? More of this stuff please. (via Drone takes light paintings into whole new realm | DVICE)

‘Dreamings’ and dreaming narratives: what’s the relationship?
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To imagine what “Australia” was like B.C. (“Before Cook”, or before colonisation), one needs to envision the entire landmass of this island/continent and most of its surrounding islands and waters as crisscrossed by “Dreamings” (in popular parlance sometimes referred to as “Songlines”). Each of the approximately 250 separate Australian languages had their own words for and substantial vocabularies relating to what has now become known in English almost universally as “The Dreamtime” or “The Dreaming”. These usages have now entered other world languages as global tags for Indigenous Australian religion, thereby dramatically reducing outsiders’ capacity to grasp the diversity of Australian languages and cultures. (It should be noted here that “Australian languages” is the linguistically accurate terminology for Aboriginal languages – which have no connection to any other language families in the world. The terminology “Australian languages” also takes on a political edge for Aboriginal language speakers, many of whom regard all other languages spoken in Australia, including English, as foreign imports). In the Ngunnawal and Ngarigo languages, for instance, in and around today’s national capital, Canberra, The Dreaming is called “Daramoolen”, and it’s “Nura” in the Dharug language, in the vicinity of Sydney. Across some of the dialects of Western Desert languages, including Pitjantjatjara, which crosses the borders of three states, South Australia, the Northern Territory and Western Australia, the word-concept is “Tjukurpa”. As a result of processes of colonisation, all of these words have been reduced to the catch-all English translation, “Dreaming”, or sometimes, “Dream Time”. (via 'Dreamings’ and dreaming narratives: what's the relationship?)

Science and art don’t intersect nearly as often as they should, despite their many similarities. Chief among those shared qualities is creativity — whether of thought, experimentation, or presentation. When science and art do meet one other, the results can be an astonishing blend of expression and fact. Each year, we report on the winners of the International Science & Engineering Visualization Challenge, a competition run by the journal Science and the U.S. National Science Foundation. This year, teams submitted more than 200 entries. The winners include a swirling, animated planetary video, a citizen science neuron-mapping interactive, and a most ingenious way of visualizing the ways in which water swirls around coral polyps. (via The Best Science and Engineering Visualizations of 2013 - Wired Science)

Humans used to be unique in lots of ways. We were the only species who made tools, murdered each other, passed on culture. And each of those supposed defining features has now been demonstrated in other species. We’re not so special after all. But there are still ways that humans appear to stand alone. One of those is hugely important: the human capacity to think symbolically. Metaphors, similes, parables, figures of speech—they exert enormous power over us. We kill for symbols, die for them. Yet symbols generate one of the most magnificent human inventions: art.

Metaphors Are Us - Issue 1: What Makes You So Special - Nautilus
The Getty and Google Unleash Free Art — And Your Creative Potential
Open sharing has been around forever, accelerating progress in diverse fields. Computing (e.g., Homebrew Computer Club), code (open source), and even academic publishing (“open access,” which goes beyond peer review) are just a few that have multiplied their social impact thanks to this openness. Art may be next, and here, too, technology will play a central role. Just a couple months ago, The Getty quietly released 5,400 new, high-resolution (800dpi) images from its Getty Research Institute for public use. But here’s the revolutionary part: They did it without fees or restriction. To put this in perspective: Not one of New York’s largest museums — the MoMA, the Whitney, the Guggenheim, the Metropolitan, or the Frick have done that yet. The big deal here isn’t just that a premiere cultural institution is making so many images available to all, but that it signals a broader, emerging “open content” art movement. Besides the Getty, the other art institutions leading this open content movement include Los Angeles’ LACMA (which made 20,000 images available for free, albeit in a smaller file size than Getty did), as well as D.C.’s National Gallery of Art, the Dallas Museum of Art, Baltimore’s Walters Art Museum, and the Yale University Art Gallery. And Google. Yes, Google: its Google Art Project (now called the Google Cultural Institute) has been working since 2010 on changing attitudes towards digitization among cultural institutions. The resulting meta-museum now includes high-resolution images of artworks from over 300 institutions available online. Google’s collection is the largest and, not surprisingly, has the most sophisticated and user-friendly UI. However, unlike the Getty, LACMA, or the National Gallery, Google restricts image downloading and sharing. This is a huge shift in attitude compared to fairly recently, when art museums viewed the web cautiously, at best. (via The Getty and Google Unleash Free Art — And Your Creative Potential | Wired Opinion | Wired.com)

The Getty and Google Unleash Free Art — And Your Creative Potential

Open sharing has been around forever, accelerating progress in diverse fields. Computing (e.g., Homebrew Computer Club), code (open source), and even academic publishing (“open access,” which goes beyond peer review) are just a few that have multiplied their social impact thanks to this openness. Art may be next, and here, too, technology will play a central role. Just a couple months ago, The Getty quietly released 5,400 new, high-resolution (800dpi) images from its Getty Research Institute for public use. But here’s the revolutionary part: They did it without fees or restriction. To put this in perspective: Not one of New York’s largest museums — the MoMA, the Whitney, the Guggenheim, the Metropolitan, or the Frick have done that yet. The big deal here isn’t just that a premiere cultural institution is making so many images available to all, but that it signals a broader, emerging “open content” art movement. Besides the Getty, the other art institutions leading this open content movement include Los Angeles’ LACMA (which made 20,000 images available for free, albeit in a smaller file size than Getty did), as well as D.C.’s National Gallery of Art, the Dallas Museum of Art, Baltimore’s Walters Art Museum, and the Yale University Art Gallery. And Google. Yes, Google: its Google Art Project (now called the Google Cultural Institute) has been working since 2010 on changing attitudes towards digitization among cultural institutions. The resulting meta-museum now includes high-resolution images of artworks from over 300 institutions available online. Google’s collection is the largest and, not surprisingly, has the most sophisticated and user-friendly UI. However, unlike the Getty, LACMA, or the National Gallery, Google restricts image downloading and sharing. This is a huge shift in attitude compared to fairly recently, when art museums viewed the web cautiously, at best. (via The Getty and Google Unleash Free Art — And Your Creative Potential | Wired Opinion | Wired.com)