A Momentary Flow

Updating Worldviews one World at a time

Brain scans of dogs could give researchers a new tool for studying what happens in the mind of man’s best friend. “I think it could open a whole new type of research on cognition,” said neuroscientist Greg Berns of Emory University, lead author on a dog-scanning study that will be published in Public Library of Science One. Berns described the initial findings, in which brain regions expected to become active in anticipation of reward did just that, as a proof-of-concept to show that studying a dog inside a functional magnetic resonance imager was logistically feasible. According to Berns, who typically investigates how human decision-making plays out in our brains, dogs may be a better animal model for studying cognition than the monkeys commonly used in such research. (via Brain Scans Give Glimpse of How Your Dog Thinks | Wired Science | Wired.com)

Brain scans of dogs could give researchers a new tool for studying what happens in the mind of man’s best friend. “I think it could open a whole new type of research on cognition,” said neuroscientist Greg Berns of Emory University, lead author on a dog-scanning study that will be published in Public Library of Science One. Berns described the initial findings, in which brain regions expected to become active in anticipation of reward did just that, as a proof-of-concept to show that studying a dog inside a functional magnetic resonance imager was logistically feasible. According to Berns, who typically investigates how human decision-making plays out in our brains, dogs may be a better animal model for studying cognition than the monkeys commonly used in such research. (via Brain Scans Give Glimpse of How Your Dog Thinks | Wired Science | Wired.com)