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A Momentary Flow

Evolving Worldviews

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131 posts tagged cyborg

#SelfieBot by Orbotix

#SelfieBot is fully autonomous and capable of flight. Forged from cutting-edge technology and programmed with advanced artificial intelligence, #SelfieBot hovers at your side and records your life in high definition. Free yourself from smartphone #selfie limitations. Reserve yours before it sells out.

#SelfieBot. Always watching… for life’s most precious moments.

(by Go Sphero)

Hugh Herr is building the next generation of bionic limbs, robotic prosthetics inspired by nature’s own designs. Herr lost both legs in a climbing accident 30 years ago; now, as the head of the MIT Media Lab’s Biomechatronics group, he shows his incredible technology in a talk that’s both technical and deeply personal — with the help of ballroom dancer Adrianne Haslet-Davis, who lost her left leg in the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing, and performs again for the first time on the TED stage. 

Cybathalon 2016: A Competition for Augmented Humans #nexthuman
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The Olympic Games are a competition for the fittest and most talented able-bodied humans on Earth. The Paralympic Games are a competition for the fittest and most talented humans on Earth with physical and intellectual disabilities. To compete, paralympians take advantage of assistive systems, some of which are becoming increasingly cybernetic, combining traditional prosthetics with robotics. ETH Zurich and the Swiss National Competence Center of Research in Robotics have an idea of where we can take this. (via Cybathalon 2016: A Competition for Augmented Humans - IEEE Spectrum)

Your favorite basketball player is about to get one step closer to being a cyborg.

The NBA’s Development League (D-League) will soon begin experimenting with wearable technology on the court, the league announced today. A small disc weighing in at a whopping one ounce—attached either to players’ chests or between their shoulder blades and worn underneath their uniforms—measures vital biological statistics.

Developed in conjunction with STAT Sports, Catapult, and Zephyr, this groundbreaking wearable tech makes available—in real time—individual players’ current state and statistics. The information is relayed to coaching and medical staffs alike in an effort to improve players’ efficiency and effectiveness on the court.

The NBA’s Development League Straps A Sensor Disc To Every Player ⚙ Co.Labs ⚙ code community (via new-aesthetic)

(via emergentfutures)

Source fastcolabs.com

Reblogged from The New Aesthetic

PLEASED project working on “plant-borgs” to act as environmental biosensors
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Many claim that talking to plants helps them grow faster. But what if the plants could talk back? That’s what the EU-funded PLants Employed As SEnsing Devices (PLEASED) project is hoping to achieve by creating plant cyborgs, or “plant-borgs.” While this technology won’t allow green thumbs to carry on a conversation with their plants, it will provide feedback on their environment by enabling the plants to act as biosensors. Like most living organisms, plants produce electrical signals in response to external stimuli. By classifying which electrical signals are produced in response to which stimulus, the PLEASED team says will be possible to use plants as biosensors to measure a variety of chemical and physical parameters, such as pollution, temperature, humidity, sunlight, acid rain, and the presence of chemicals in organic agriculture. In an interview with youris.com, project coordinator Andrea Vitaletti admits that there are already artificial devices capable of measuring such parameters, but plants are everywhere, cheap, robust and don’t require calibration. They are also able to measure multiple parameters simultaneously. This is both a plus and a minus because it will make it more difficult to differentiate between different electrical signals that occur simultaneously. (via PLEASED project working on “plant-borgs” to act as environmental biosensors)

PLEASED project working on “plant-borgs” to act as environmental biosensors
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Many claim that talking to plants helps them grow faster. But what if the plants could talk back? That’s what the EU-funded PLants Employed As SEnsing Devices (PLEASED) project is hoping to achieve by creating plant cyborgs, or “plant-borgs.” While this technology won’t allow green thumbs to carry on a conversation with their plants, it will provide feedback on their environment by enabling the plants to act as biosensors. Like most living organisms, plants produce electrical signals in response to external stimuli. By classifying which electrical signals are produced in response to which stimulus, the PLEASED team says will be possible to use plants as biosensors to measure a variety of chemical and physical parameters, such as pollution, temperature, humidity, sunlight, acid rain, and the presence of chemicals in organic agriculture. In an interview with youris.com, project coordinator Andrea Vitaletti admits that there are already artificial devices capable of measuring such parameters, but plants are everywhere, cheap, robust and don’t require calibration. They are also able to measure multiple parameters simultaneously. This is both a plus and a minus because it will make it more difficult to differentiate between different electrical signals that occur simultaneously. (via PLEASED project working on “plant-borgs” to act as environmental biosensors)

CSIRO, University of Tasmania scientists fit tiny sensors onto honey bees to study behaviour
Scientists in Tasmania are fitting thousands of honey bees with tiny sensors as part of a project aimed at understanding the insect’s behaviour and population decline. CSIRO is working with the University of Tasmania, beekeepers and fruit growers to trial the monitoring technology, in an attempt to improve honey bee pollination and productivity. They are fitting tiny sensors to the insects, a process which sometimes involves shaving them first. “This has been done before,” CSIRO science leader Paulo de Souza said. “The difference here is about the size of the sensor. And the difference is the number; we’re talking about 5,000 bees.” The sensors measure 2.5 millimetres by 2.5mm and act like a vehicle’s “e-TAG”, recording when the bees pass particular checkpoints. Researchers can use the signals from the sensors to find out how the bees move through the landscape and understand changes in their behaviour. They are also looking at the impacts of pesticides on the honey bees and the drivers of a condition decimating bee populations globally. “If it impacts the bees, it impacts the whole industry that is producing food,” Dr de Souza said. “This should help us understand optimal productivity conditions, as well as further our knowledge of the cause of colony collapse disorder.” (via CSIRO, University of Tasmania scientists fit tiny sensors onto honey bees to study behaviour - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation))

CSIRO, University of Tasmania scientists fit tiny sensors onto honey bees to study behaviour

Scientists in Tasmania are fitting thousands of honey bees with tiny sensors as part of a project aimed at understanding the insect’s behaviour and population decline. CSIRO is working with the University of Tasmania, beekeepers and fruit growers to trial the monitoring technology, in an attempt to improve honey bee pollination and productivity. They are fitting tiny sensors to the insects, a process which sometimes involves shaving them first. “This has been done before,” CSIRO science leader Paulo de Souza said. “The difference here is about the size of the sensor. And the difference is the number; we’re talking about 5,000 bees.” The sensors measure 2.5 millimetres by 2.5mm and act like a vehicle’s “e-TAG”, recording when the bees pass particular checkpoints. Researchers can use the signals from the sensors to find out how the bees move through the landscape and understand changes in their behaviour. They are also looking at the impacts of pesticides on the honey bees and the drivers of a condition decimating bee populations globally. “If it impacts the bees, it impacts the whole industry that is producing food,” Dr de Souza said. “This should help us understand optimal productivity conditions, as well as further our knowledge of the cause of colony collapse disorder.” (via CSIRO, University of Tasmania scientists fit tiny sensors onto honey bees to study behaviour - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation))

We’re All Cyborgs, That’s What Makes Us Human

The issue is that technology shapes the way we think, and it’s difficult, perhaps impossible, to extricate ourselves from the technologies we use. Pang calls this “entanglement,” and he points to ancient examples — such as soldiers feeling that swords were extensions of their bodies — to illustrate how core this is to the human condition.

But being entangled with a tool like a hammer or even a machine like a car is different from being entangled with a social network.

Your mind is meshing not just with a computer but with the people you interact with — and the designers of the new technology. Pang does suggest taking digital sabbaths to cope with these technologies, but thankfully it’s not the only strategy he suggests for coping with network technologies. One of his other major pieces of advice is to take up meditation, and that’s where things get interesting.

While sketching the history of these techniques, he notes something interesting: the rise of meditation and other contemplative techniques coincided with the rise of urbanization, imperialism and international trade. Although these techniques existed for many years as part of “mystery schools,” it wasn’t until between 800 and 200 B.C. that they started to become available to outsiders.

We might not think of cities, governments and economies as technologies, but they are. And just like social networks and mobile phones, they entangle us with other people and with the logic shaped by policies crafted by other people.

Lessons From Monks About Designing The Technologies Of The Future | TechCrunch
The Argus, named after the all-seeing Greek god with 100 eyes, is a wearable computer that helps blind people see borders and boundaries at very low resolution. We first reported on the device some eight years ago, when it was still in testing. Now, at long last, the Food and Drug Administration has approved its use in the U.S. for people with Lloyd’s condition, and the device will begin selling shortly at select medical centers, including the University of California, San Francisco.
The Argus is not a true “eyes for the blind” device — patients can’t see objects in the same way people with normal eyesight can. Instead, they see black-and-white edges and contrast points, and the brain can be trained to use this artificial data as a visual guide. It provides enough visual information for the patient to gain some independence, allowing them to cross a street safely, or navigate an unfamiliar room.
“You have to learn to see again, but people who have this implant were people that used to see,” said Lloyd, one of the first patients to get the Argus. “As you go through life, you still have pictures in your brain of everything you’ve seen before. So, you’re creating yourself an image that matches what’s in your memory. It’s a concept that a lot of people don’t get when they think about this device.”
(via New Wearable Device Helps Blind Patients See Shapes and Colors | Gadget Lab | Wired.com)

The Argus, named after the all-seeing Greek god with 100 eyes, is a wearable computer that helps blind people see borders and boundaries at very low resolution. We first reported on the device some eight years ago, when it was still in testing. Now, at long last, the Food and Drug Administration has approved its use in the U.S. for people with Lloyd’s condition, and the device will begin selling shortly at select medical centers, including the University of California, San Francisco.

The Argus is not a true “eyes for the blind” device — patients can’t see objects in the same way people with normal eyesight can. Instead, they see black-and-white edges and contrast points, and the brain can be trained to use this artificial data as a visual guide. It provides enough visual information for the patient to gain some independence, allowing them to cross a street safely, or navigate an unfamiliar room.

“You have to learn to see again, but people who have this implant were people that used to see,” said Lloyd, one of the first patients to get the Argus. “As you go through life, you still have pictures in your brain of everything you’ve seen before. So, you’re creating yourself an image that matches what’s in your memory. It’s a concept that a lot of people don’t get when they think about this device.”

(via New Wearable Device Helps Blind Patients See Shapes and Colors | Gadget Lab | Wired.com)

Power Jacket MK3 leaps from comic book pages into reality

In recent years Japan has erected life-sized statues of giant robots like Tetsujin-28 go (Gigantor) and a Gundam mobile suit, but statues can’t defend the island nation from kaiju attack. Perhaps that is why Sagawa Electronics is bridging the gap between fantasy and reality with a working robotic exoskeleton it calls the Power Jacket MK3 that mimics your every move. And it says it will produce up to five of them for about US$123,000 apiece. (via Power Jacket MK3 leaps from comic book pages into reality)