A Momentary Flow

Updating Worldviews one World at a time

You’ve Been Obsessing Over Your Likes and Retweets Way Too Much - The digital age version of the proverbial tree falling in the woods question is: Does something exist if it hasn’t been liked, favorited, linked to, or re-tweeted? According to many tech critics, the tragic answer is no. Like Lady Gaga, we live for the applause. But if constantly chasing other people’s approval is a shallow way to live that leads to time and energy being wasted over pleasing others and recurring feelings of insecurity and emptiness, how can we course correct? The first step is to acknowledge a problem exists. Too many people are desperate for attention and build their self-esteem with bricks made of external recognition. Take Rameet Chawla, founder of the mobile app company Fueled. Feeling spurned by friends who didn’t appreciate that he simply was too busy to like their pics on Instagram, Chawla became desperate and resorted to a depressing measure: outsourcing faux sentiment to technology. He actually designed a program that automatically liked the photos other people posted, and then, voilà, his “popularity soared.”
 (via You’ve Been Obsessing Over Your Likes and Retweets Way Too Much | Opinion | WIRED)

You’ve Been Obsessing Over Your Likes and Retweets Way Too Much
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The digital age version of the proverbial tree falling in the woods question is: Does something exist if it hasn’t been liked, favorited, linked to, or re-tweeted? According to many tech critics, the tragic answer is no. Like Lady Gaga, we live for the applause. But if constantly chasing other people’s approval is a shallow way to live that leads to time and energy being wasted over pleasing others and recurring feelings of insecurity and emptiness, how can we course correct? The first step is to acknowledge a problem exists. Too many people are desperate for attention and build their self-esteem with bricks made of external recognition. Take Rameet Chawla, founder of the mobile app company Fueled. Feeling spurned by friends who didn’t appreciate that he simply was too busy to like their pics on Instagram, Chawla became desperate and resorted to a depressing measure: outsourcing faux sentiment to technology. He actually designed a program that automatically liked the photos other people posted, and then, voilà, his “popularity soared.”
 (via You’ve Been Obsessing Over Your Likes and Retweets Way Too Much | Opinion | WIRED)

Developmental psychologists often talk about the importance of leaving a legacy—something tied to who we are that will outlive us. But this is usually something obvious, like having children or writing a novel. An avatar with an approximation of your voice and bone structure, who can tell your great-grandchildren how many Twitter followers you had, doesn’t feel like the same thing. And what of the period of grief in the days, weeks, and months following a friend or relative’s death? “A post-death avatar goes against all we know about bereavement,” Joan Berzoff, the director of an end-of-life certificate program at the Smith College School for Social Work, in Northampton, Massachusetts, told me. For the time being, it seems that Eterni.me’s appeal is more philosophical than practical. “A hundred years down the track you might not only be able to talk to your mom who died a year ago, but to your grandmother who died when you were sixteen, and your great-grandmother who died before you was born,” Susan Bluck, a psychology professor at the University of Florida, said. “So it means that we could, in some way, forge relations with ancestors who lived and died well before our own lifetime.”

How to Become Virtually Immortal : The New Yorker

Shelfie: show us a photo of your bookshelf
From celebrities to politicians, selfies have been all over the internet in 2013. But perhaps shelfies would be more interesting?

This year may go down in history as the year of the ‘selfie’, with even world leaders getting in on the act, but we’re asking for something a little different. We want your shelfie. What’s more telling than a bookshelf? You can share a snap of a single shelf or your entire bookcase - you decide. If you’re feeling in a particularly adventurous mood, you could even film yourself giving a guided tour of your shelf, explaining your categorising methods; do you, for example, only place novels together if you think the characters in them would get along? You can send us your photo by clicking on the blue ‘contribute’ button on this page or download the free GuardianWitness smartphone app and upload your shelfie from your phone. You can look at the contributions on GuardianWitness and we’ll feature a selection of our favourite image (via Shelfie: show us a photo of your bookshelf | Books | theguardian.com)
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How do you show a Shelfie for ebooks?

Shelfie: show us a photo of your bookshelf

From celebrities to politicians, selfies have been all over the internet in 2013. But perhaps shelfies would be more interesting?

This year may go down in history as the year of the ‘selfie’, with even world leaders getting in on the act, but we’re asking for something a little different. We want your shelfie. What’s more telling than a bookshelf? You can share a snap of a single shelf or your entire bookcase - you decide. If you’re feeling in a particularly adventurous mood, you could even film yourself giving a guided tour of your shelf, explaining your categorising methods; do you, for example, only place novels together if you think the characters in them would get along? You can send us your photo by clicking on the blue ‘contribute’ button on this page or download the free GuardianWitness smartphone app and upload your shelfie from your phone. You can look at the contributions on GuardianWitness and we’ll feature a selection of our favourite image (via Shelfie: show us a photo of your bookshelf | Books | theguardian.com)

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How do you show a Shelfie for ebooks?