A Momentary Flow

Updating Worldviews one World at a time

Developmental psychologists often talk about the importance of leaving a legacy—something tied to who we are that will outlive us. But this is usually something obvious, like having children or writing a novel. An avatar with an approximation of your voice and bone structure, who can tell your great-grandchildren how many Twitter followers you had, doesn’t feel like the same thing. And what of the period of grief in the days, weeks, and months following a friend or relative’s death? “A post-death avatar goes against all we know about bereavement,” Joan Berzoff, the director of an end-of-life certificate program at the Smith College School for Social Work, in Northampton, Massachusetts, told me. For the time being, it seems that Eterni.me’s appeal is more philosophical than practical. “A hundred years down the track you might not only be able to talk to your mom who died a year ago, but to your grandmother who died when you were sixteen, and your great-grandmother who died before you was born,” Susan Bluck, a psychology professor at the University of Florida, said. “So it means that we could, in some way, forge relations with ancestors who lived and died well before our own lifetime.”

How to Become Virtually Immortal : The New Yorker

Shelfie: show us a photo of your bookshelf
From celebrities to politicians, selfies have been all over the internet in 2013. But perhaps shelfies would be more interesting?

This year may go down in history as the year of the ‘selfie’, with even world leaders getting in on the act, but we’re asking for something a little different. We want your shelfie. What’s more telling than a bookshelf? You can share a snap of a single shelf or your entire bookcase - you decide. If you’re feeling in a particularly adventurous mood, you could even film yourself giving a guided tour of your shelf, explaining your categorising methods; do you, for example, only place novels together if you think the characters in them would get along? You can send us your photo by clicking on the blue ‘contribute’ button on this page or download the free GuardianWitness smartphone app and upload your shelfie from your phone. You can look at the contributions on GuardianWitness and we’ll feature a selection of our favourite image (via Shelfie: show us a photo of your bookshelf | Books | theguardian.com)
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How do you show a Shelfie for ebooks?

Shelfie: show us a photo of your bookshelf

From celebrities to politicians, selfies have been all over the internet in 2013. But perhaps shelfies would be more interesting?

This year may go down in history as the year of the ‘selfie’, with even world leaders getting in on the act, but we’re asking for something a little different. We want your shelfie. What’s more telling than a bookshelf? You can share a snap of a single shelf or your entire bookcase - you decide. If you’re feeling in a particularly adventurous mood, you could even film yourself giving a guided tour of your shelf, explaining your categorising methods; do you, for example, only place novels together if you think the characters in them would get along? You can send us your photo by clicking on the blue ‘contribute’ button on this page or download the free GuardianWitness smartphone app and upload your shelfie from your phone. You can look at the contributions on GuardianWitness and we’ll feature a selection of our favourite image (via Shelfie: show us a photo of your bookshelf | Books | theguardian.com)

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How do you show a Shelfie for ebooks?

Remembering is traditionally a social enterprise. One person knows how to cook a turkey. A partner recalls how to fix the leak in the sink.
The Internet changes everything. With nearly ubiquitous online access, many people may first perform a smartphone search rather than calling a friend.
Being online all the time changes the subjective sense of self as borders between personal memories and information distributed across the Internet start to blur.

The Internet Has Become the External Hard Drive for Our Memories: Scientific American

WIRED: The internet is integrated. Could it be conscious?

Koch: It’s difficult to say right now. But consider this. The internet contains about 10 billion computers, with each computer itself having a couple of billion transistors in its CPU. So the internet has at least 10^19 transistors, compared to the roughly 1000 trillion (or quadrillion) synapses in the human brain. That’s about 10,000 times more transistors than synapses. But is the internet more complex than the human brain? It depends on the degree of integration of the internet.
For instance, our brains are connected all the time. On the internet, computers are packet-switching. They’re not connected permanently, but rapidly switch from one to another. But according to my version of panpsychism, it feels like something to be the internet — and if the internet were down, it wouldn’t feel like anything anymore. And that is, in principle, not different from the way I feel when I’m in a deep, dreamless sleep.

A Neuroscientist’s Radical Theory of How Networks Become Conscious - Wired Science
Future Internet aims to sever links with servers
A revolutionary new architecture aims to make the internet more “social” by eliminating the need to connect to servers and enabling all content to be shared more efficiently. Researchers have taken the first step towards a radical new architecture for the internet, which they claim will transform the way in which information is shared online, and make it faster and safer to use. The prototype, which has been developed as part of an EU-funded project called “Pursuit”, is being put forward as a proof-of concept model for overhauling the existing structure of the internet’s IP layer, through which isolated networks are connected, or “internetworked”. The Pursuit Internet would, according to its creators, enable a more socially-minded and intelligent system, in which users would be able to obtain information without needing direct access to the servers where content is initially stored. Instead, individual computers would be able to copy and republish content on receipt, providing other users with the option to access data, or fragments of data, from a wide range of locations rather than the source itself. Essentially, the model would enable all online content to be shared in a manner emulating the “peer-to-peer” approach taken by some file-sharing sites, but on an unprecedented, internet-wide scale. (via Future Internet aims to sever links with servers)

Future Internet aims to sever links with servers

A revolutionary new architecture aims to make the internet more “social” by eliminating the need to connect to servers and enabling all content to be shared more efficiently. Researchers have taken the first step towards a radical new architecture for the internet, which they claim will transform the way in which information is shared online, and make it faster and safer to use. The prototype, which has been developed as part of an EU-funded project called “Pursuit”, is being put forward as a proof-of concept model for overhauling the existing structure of the internet’s IP layer, through which isolated networks are connected, or “internetworked”. The Pursuit Internet would, according to its creators, enable a more socially-minded and intelligent system, in which users would be able to obtain information without needing direct access to the servers where content is initially stored. Instead, individual computers would be able to copy and republish content on receipt, providing other users with the option to access data, or fragments of data, from a wide range of locations rather than the source itself. Essentially, the model would enable all online content to be shared in a manner emulating the “peer-to-peer” approach taken by some file-sharing sites, but on an unprecedented, internet-wide scale. (via Future Internet aims to sever links with servers)