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A Momentary Flow

Evolving Worldviews

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9 posts tagged mobile

University of Vienna app uses your phone for research while you sleep
Our mobile phones generally lie dormant while we’re asleep, which means that millions of powerful processors are going unused for hours at a time. Samsung Austria and the University of Vienna’s Faculty of Life Sciences have teamed up to try and tap the potential of all that unused processing power. Power Sleep is a new Android app that allows mobile phone users to donate the processing power of their devices to scientific research while they are asleep. The Power Sleep app provides users with a simple alarm clock function. When the alarm is set and the user’s phone is plugged in, fully charged and connected to a Wi-Fi network, the app begins to process data sent from the Similarity Matrix of Proteins (SIMAP) database. The research is focused on deciphering protein sequences in order to help with medical advancements in disciplines such as genetics and heredity, biochemistry, molecular biology and cancer research. “In order to fight diseases like cancer and Alzheimers, we need to know how proteins are arranged,” says Thomas Rattei, professor of bioinformatics at the University of Vienna. “This requires trials that need a tremendous amount of processing power. Power Sleep is a bridge between science and society. It promotes not only our research, but allows people in Austria to become part of the project and, at the same time, to do good in their sleep.” (via University of Vienna app uses your phone for research while you sleep)

University of Vienna app uses your phone for research while you sleep

Our mobile phones generally lie dormant while we’re asleep, which means that millions of powerful processors are going unused for hours at a time. Samsung Austria and the University of Vienna’s Faculty of Life Sciences have teamed up to try and tap the potential of all that unused processing power. Power Sleep is a new Android app that allows mobile phone users to donate the processing power of their devices to scientific research while they are asleep. The Power Sleep app provides users with a simple alarm clock function. When the alarm is set and the user’s phone is plugged in, fully charged and connected to a Wi-Fi network, the app begins to process data sent from the Similarity Matrix of Proteins (SIMAP) database. The research is focused on deciphering protein sequences in order to help with medical advancements in disciplines such as genetics and heredity, biochemistry, molecular biology and cancer research. “In order to fight diseases like cancer and Alzheimers, we need to know how proteins are arranged,” says Thomas Rattei, professor of bioinformatics at the University of Vienna. “This requires trials that need a tremendous amount of processing power. Power Sleep is a bridge between science and society. It promotes not only our research, but allows people in Austria to become part of the project and, at the same time, to do good in their sleep.” (via University of Vienna app uses your phone for research while you sleep)

It is perhaps tempting to see this as suggesting that new electronic spaces are being created that transcend the spatial arrangements and constraints of mundane reality. We resist such an interpretation, though. The “technosocial situations” that Ito and Okabe detail are certainly forms of social and cultural practice that rely on information technology for the forms that they currently manifest. Still, they are firmly situated within, motivated by, and shaped in response to everyday life. Mobile-messaging technologies in the examples cited by Ito and Okabe do not create new spaces but rather allow people to encounter and appropriate existing spaces in different ways (see also Ellwood-Clayton 2003, 2005; Prøitz 2005). These new mobile practices, then, transform existing spaces as sites of everyday action. Far from seeing technology as creating a space apart, we view it as being fundamentally a part of how one encounters urban space and how it is shaped through technologically mediated mobility.

Dourish and Bell, Divining a Digital Future. 2011, MIT Press. (via gordonr)

(via stoweboyd)

A new report from the World Bank details the astounding growth of mobile since the year 2000. Then — just 12 years ago — there were less than a billion mobile subscriptions worldwide. Today, there are more than 6 billion and the count will “will soon exceed that of the human population,” according to the Bank (it is common in many countries for one person to own multiple SIM cards). Three-quarters of the world population now has access to a mobile phone. A comparison between mobile and landline subscriptions shows just how bananas mobile is — both in the pace of its diffusion around the world and, today, its predominance. (via A World With More Phones Than People - Rebecca J. Rosen - The Atlantic)

A new report from the World Bank details the astounding growth of mobile since the year 2000. Then — just 12 years ago — there were less than a billion mobile subscriptions worldwide. Today, there are more than 6 billion and the count will “will soon exceed that of the human population,” according to the Bank (it is common in many countries for one person to own multiple SIM cards). Three-quarters of the world population now has access to a mobile phone. A comparison between mobile and landline subscriptions shows just how bananas mobile is — both in the pace of its diffusion around the world and, today, its predominance. (via A World With More Phones Than People - Rebecca J. Rosen - The Atlantic)

There’s no other technology in the world that 87% of the world’s population owns. And yet, despite mobile devices’ ubiquity and connectivity, we are only beginning to realize what’s possible. But most organizations, in fact most people, aren’t ready for the massive cultural, health, business and government impacts that these mobile devices are about to deliver. I believe mobile technologies will displace many of the fixed-location technologies that keep people and businesses chained to physical places. Who needs a store when you can point, click and buy a product from Amazon.com? Indeed, who needs to visit a bank branch when you can transfer money anywhere using services like Paypal or Square? According to Price Waterhouse Coopers’ latest Digital IQ survey, 66% of organizations are investing in mobile technologies for their employees. But these businesses are reacting to the Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) phenomenon, most are not preparing for it.

How Mobile is Rapidly Evolving the World - Forbes

The last time your doctor asked how much you exercise, did you tell the truth? Do you even really know the truth—not just how many visits to the gym you’ve made this month, but how many hours you sit or how many calories you burn in a day? What if your doctor had already received the information from a tiny device built into your cell phone, wallet, or undershirt? Sonny Vu believes a device like this could fundamentally change health care. “You can’t just lie to your doctor—it’s all there, recorded,” he says. “You cut right to the chase rather than having to tease out all that information.”

Wearing a Computer Is Good for You - Technology Review
Once in a while, you might feel like you’re being watched. Lately, I know I am, thanks to a smart-phone app that stealthily tracks my every move, no check-ins required, with greater accuracy than common geolocation tools. Called Placeme, the free app takes advantage of the smart phone’s sensors and its GPS and Wi-Fi capabilities to figure out where I go and for how long, and stores this data in a private log on my iPhone. It may sound creepy or unnecessary, but as more people carry smart phones with them everywhere, demand for this kind of persistent location tracking may grow—not just from marketers, but also from individuals who want to keep an eye on their own movements or of loved ones with medical conditions such as Alzheimer’s. At least, that’s the hope of the startup behind Placeme, Alohar Mobile, which has also released a software development kit to help coders create apps that can log your movements accurately and efficiently—without running down the battery in your smart phone. (via New App Watches Your Every Move - Technology Review)

Once in a while, you might feel like you’re being watched. Lately, I know I am, thanks to a smart-phone app that stealthily tracks my every move, no check-ins required, with greater accuracy than common geolocation tools. Called Placeme, the free app takes advantage of the smart phone’s sensors and its GPS and Wi-Fi capabilities to figure out where I go and for how long, and stores this data in a private log on my iPhone. It may sound creepy or unnecessary, but as more people carry smart phones with them everywhere, demand for this kind of persistent location tracking may grow—not just from marketers, but also from individuals who want to keep an eye on their own movements or of loved ones with medical conditions such as Alzheimer’s. At least, that’s the hope of the startup behind Placeme, Alohar Mobile, which has also released a software development kit to help coders create apps that can log your movements accurately and efficiently—without running down the battery in your smart phone. (via New App Watches Your Every Move - Technology Review)

How Augmented Reality Is Going Viral in the Art World, From the Omi Sculpture Park to a 9/11 Memorial by ArtInfo
prostheticknowledge:


Above: “Unraveled” created by the architect Daniel Libeskind

The aesthetic potential of such applications is obvious, and as a medium  for art, AR has been gaining in mainstream appeal as ever more  art-lovers adopt the appropriate technology. From public art  installations to advertising initiatives, AR is everywhere. Few AR  artworks have met with critical acclaim — but that may be changing with  the latest generation of virtual art.

More here

How Augmented Reality Is Going Viral in the Art World, From the Omi Sculpture Park to a 9/11 Memorial by ArtInfo

prostheticknowledge:


Above: “Unraveled” created by the architect Daniel Libeskind

The aesthetic potential of such applications is obvious, and as a medium for art, AR has been gaining in mainstream appeal as ever more art-lovers adopt the appropriate technology. From public art installations to advertising initiatives, AR is everywhere. Few AR artworks have met with critical acclaim — but that may be changing with the latest generation of virtual art.

More here

(via mattermedia-deactivated20121109)