A Momentary Flow

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208 posts tagged robots

Marco Tempest: Maybe the best robot demo ever

Marco Tempest uses charming stagecraft to demo EDI, the multi-purpose robot designed to work very closely with humans. Less a magic trick than an intricately choreographed performance, Tempest shows off the robot’s sensing technology, safety features and strength, and makes the case for a closer human-robot relationship. (Okay, there’s a little magic, too.)

Want a dog but don’t want to deal with dog poop or allergies or fleas? The Omnibot Hello! Zoomer Dog Robot is the robotic pet you’re looking for.

This man-made version of a dalmatian recognizes over 45 words (English and Japanese), has voice recognition, and can be trained to perform a variety of tricks, including shake, roll over, and play dead. Of course, unlike a dog, Zoomer also comes with a USB cord and needs to be charged for an hour to get twenty minutes of use. Just think of it as a nap… that includes electricit (via Omnibot Hello! Zoomer Dog Robot | GeekAlerts)

Want a dog but don’t want to deal with dog poop or allergies or fleas? The Omnibot Hello! Zoomer Dog Robot is the robotic pet you’re looking for.

This man-made version of a dalmatian recognizes over 45 words (English and Japanese), has voice recognition, and can be trained to perform a variety of tricks, including shake, roll over, and play dead. Of course, unlike a dog, Zoomer also comes with a USB cord and needs to be charged for an hour to get twenty minutes of use. Just think of it as a nap… that includes electricit (via Omnibot Hello! Zoomer Dog Robot | GeekAlerts)

#SelfieBot by Orbotix

#SelfieBot is fully autonomous and capable of flight. Forged from cutting-edge technology and programmed with advanced artificial intelligence, #SelfieBot hovers at your side and records your life in high definition. Free yourself from smartphone #selfie limitations. Reserve yours before it sells out.

#SelfieBot. Always watching… for life’s most precious moments.

(by Go Sphero)

If you want to trust a robot, look at how it makes decisions 
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Robots, and autonomous systems in general, can cause anxiety and uncertainty, particularly as their use in everyday tasks becomes a more immediate possibility. In order to lessen at least some of that anxiety, we should shift our focus from the decisions robots could make on our behalf to how they actually make them in the first place. In some ways, they may be more trustworthy than a human. Like it or not, autonomous systems are here and here to stay. By “autonomy” we mean the ability of a system to make its own decisions about what to do and when to do it. So far, most of the examples you might have come across, such as robot vacuum cleaners, aircraft autopilots and automated parking systems in your car, are simple and not even particularly autonomous. These systems adapt to their environment, responding automatically to environmental changes. They are pre-programmed to adapt to environmental stimuli. But old science fiction stories warn us about systems that go further. What worries us is what happens when a human pilot, driver or operator is replaced by software that makes its own choices about what to do. In air travel, an autopilot system can keep an aircraft flying on a certain path, but there is a human pilot deciding which path to take, when to divert, and how to deal with unexpected situations. Similarly, cruise control, lane control and soon convoying will allow our cars to carry out path following activities though drivers will continue to make the big decisions. But once we move to truly autonomous systems, software will play a much bigger part. We will no longer need a human to decide when to change the route of an aircraft or when to turn off the motorway onto a side road. (via If you want to trust a robot, look at how it makes decisions)

If you want to trust a robot, look at how it makes decisions
-
Robots, and autonomous systems in general, can cause anxiety and uncertainty, particularly as their use in everyday tasks becomes a more immediate possibility. In order to lessen at least some of that anxiety, we should shift our focus from the decisions robots could make on our behalf to how they actually make them in the first place. In some ways, they may be more trustworthy than a human. Like it or not, autonomous systems are here and here to stay. By “autonomy” we mean the ability of a system to make its own decisions about what to do and when to do it. So far, most of the examples you might have come across, such as robot vacuum cleaners, aircraft autopilots and automated parking systems in your car, are simple and not even particularly autonomous. These systems adapt to their environment, responding automatically to environmental changes. They are pre-programmed to adapt to environmental stimuli. But old science fiction stories warn us about systems that go further. What worries us is what happens when a human pilot, driver or operator is replaced by software that makes its own choices about what to do. In air travel, an autopilot system can keep an aircraft flying on a certain path, but there is a human pilot deciding which path to take, when to divert, and how to deal with unexpected situations. Similarly, cruise control, lane control and soon convoying will allow our cars to carry out path following activities though drivers will continue to make the big decisions. But once we move to truly autonomous systems, software will play a much bigger part. We will no longer need a human to decide when to change the route of an aircraft or when to turn off the motorway onto a side road. (via If you want to trust a robot, look at how it makes decisions)