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NASA unveils 6-foot ‘superhero robot’ Valkyrie
Designed to compete in the DARPA Robotics Challenge, this “female” robot could be the precursor to robo-astronauts that will help colonize Mars.
What if NASA’s Robonaut grew legs and indulged in steroids? The result might be close to what NASA has unveiled: Valkyrie is a humanoid machine billed as a “superhero robot.” Developed at the Johnson Space Center, Valkyrie is a 6.2-foot, 275-pound hulk designed to compete in the DARPA Robotics Challenge (DRC). It will go toe to toe with the Terminator-like Atlas robot from Boston Dynamics in what’s shaping up to be an amazing modern-day duel. In an interesting twist, Valkyrie seems to be a girl. While officially genderless, “Valkyrie” (a nickname, since the official designation is R5) evokes the goddess-like females of Norse myth. (via NASA unveils 6-foot ‘superhero robot’ Valkyrie | Crave - CNET)

NASA unveils 6-foot ‘superhero robot’ Valkyrie

Designed to compete in the DARPA Robotics Challenge, this “female” robot could be the precursor to robo-astronauts that will help colonize Mars.

What if NASA’s Robonaut grew legs and indulged in steroids? The result might be close to what NASA has unveiled: Valkyrie is a humanoid machine billed as a “superhero robot.” Developed at the Johnson Space Center, Valkyrie is a 6.2-foot, 275-pound hulk designed to compete in the DARPA Robotics Challenge (DRC). It will go toe to toe with the Terminator-like Atlas robot from Boston Dynamics in what’s shaping up to be an amazing modern-day duel. In an interesting twist, Valkyrie seems to be a girl. While officially genderless, “Valkyrie” (a nickname, since the official designation is R5) evokes the goddess-like females of Norse myth. (via NASA unveils 6-foot ‘superhero robot’ Valkyrie | Crave - CNET)

Inside Adam Savage’s Cave: Awesome Robot Spider!

We’re back in Adam’s cave to check out his latest obsession, a robot spider with incredibly realistic movement. Adam shows off the special box and platform he built to tinker and calibrate the spider, and then sends it crawling around the pool table in his shop. It’s not for the arachnophobic!

Find out more about the Robugtix here: http://www.robugtix.com/

More cool stuff from Adam Savage’s Cave here: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…

(by Tested)

This 6-Foot, 330-Pound Robot May One Day Save Your Life By Jason Kehe
Meet Atlas, the Pentagon’s 6’2”, 330-pound humanitarian robot. He was designed to save lives in disaster zones (like Fukushima). But while this Tin Man has a heart, he lacks a brain. In December, seven teams of scientists from top institutions, including MIT and Virginia Tech, will compete to code the bot for action. Each team will send its own Atlas into Darpa’s trials—eight tasks that will test his ability to navigate degraded terrain, drive a utility vehicle, and enter buildings. “We designed Atlas to facilitate programming, but we expect Darpa to make the com­petition challenging,” says Marc Raibert, president of Boston Dynamics, Atlas’ maker. Here’s the skinny on the massive bot. (via This 6-Foot, 330-Pound Robot May One Day Save Your Life | Danger Room | Wired.com)

This 6-Foot, 330-Pound Robot May One Day Save Your Life By Jason Kehe

Meet Atlas, the Pentagon’s 6’2”, 330-pound humanitarian robot. He was designed to save lives in disaster zones (like Fukushima). But while this Tin Man has a heart, he lacks a brain. In December, seven teams of scientists from top institutions, including MIT and Virginia Tech, will compete to code the bot for action. Each team will send its own Atlas into Darpa’s trials—eight tasks that will test his ability to navigate degraded terrain, drive a utility vehicle, and enter buildings. “We designed Atlas to facilitate programming, but we expect Darpa to make the com­petition challenging,” says Marc Raibert, president of Boston Dynamics, Atlas’ maker. Here’s the skinny on the massive bot. (via This 6-Foot, 330-Pound Robot May One Day Save Your Life | Danger Room | Wired.com)

Source Wired

Superfast rock-paper-scissors robot ‘wins’ every time

A robot developed by Japanese scientists is so fast it can “win” the rock-paper-scissors game against a human every single time.

The Janken robot - named after the game’s Japanese name - is a faster version of one unveiled by University of Tokyo researchers in June 2012. Version two completes its chosen hand shape almost at the same time as the human hand. It uses high-speed recognition and reaction, rather than prediction. Technically, the robot cheats because it reacts extremely quickly to what the human hand is doing rather than making a premeditated simultaneous action as the rules state. Taking just one millisecond (ms) - a thousandth of a second - to recognise what shape the human hand is making, it then chooses a winning move and reacts at high speed. Version one completed its shape 20ms after the human hand; version two finishes almost simultaneously. The scientists at the Ishikawa Oku Laboratory, part of the University of Tokyo, specialise in a range of technologies, including “sensor fusion”, which aims to replicate and improve upon the human senses using high-speed intelligent robots. (via BBC News - Superfast rock-paper-scissors robot ‘wins’ every time)

How Digital Labor Will Drive the Third Industrial Revolution
“By 2020, the labor reduction effect of digitization will cause social unrest and a quest for new economic models in several mature economies.” This dire warning from IT analyst Gartner has good pedigree: John Maynard Keynes coined the term “technological unemployment” in 1930 to describe labor-saving innovation outpacing the ability to find new things for people to do. In the 1970s, the lack of work in the imminent future was regarded as a major challenge — how would people survive permanent leisure? Go back two centuries and even in the midst of serfdom, Voltaire offered an answer: “Work saves us from three great evils: boredom, vice and need.” So is it serious this time? Are we on the brink of Industrial Revolution 3.0? One battleground of profound change will be the office. This is the 21st Century factory, employing some 30 percent of the workforce in mature economies. The office has had a superb record in resisting productivity improvements. Despite enormous investments in IT, “knowledge” work seems to have been immune from silicon-based onslaught. So what is new? In a word: Robots. In the last few years, a new kind of digitized employee has moved from the factory floor to the back office of businesses and they are different from traditional IT. (via How Digital Labor Will Drive the Third Industrial Revolution | Innovation Insights | Wired.com)

How Digital Labor Will Drive the Third Industrial Revolution

“By 2020, the labor reduction effect of digitization will cause social unrest and a quest for new economic models in several mature economies.” This dire warning from IT analyst Gartner has good pedigree: John Maynard Keynes coined the term “technological unemployment” in 1930 to describe labor-saving innovation outpacing the ability to find new things for people to do. In the 1970s, the lack of work in the imminent future was regarded as a major challenge — how would people survive permanent leisure? Go back two centuries and even in the midst of serfdom, Voltaire offered an answer: “Work saves us from three great evils: boredom, vice and need.” So is it serious this time? Are we on the brink of Industrial Revolution 3.0? One battleground of profound change will be the office. This is the 21st Century factory, employing some 30 percent of the workforce in mature economies. The office has had a superb record in resisting productivity improvements. Despite enormous investments in IT, “knowledge” work seems to have been immune from silicon-based onslaught. So what is new? In a word: Robots. In the last few years, a new kind of digitized employee has moved from the factory floor to the back office of businesses and they are different from traditional IT. (via How Digital Labor Will Drive the Third Industrial Revolution | Innovation Insights | Wired.com)

Robokind Zeno R25 social robot detects and mimics emotions
More and more, robots are moving into our everyday lives, and if they’re not going to end up being incredibly annoying, they’re going to have to learn to recognize and cope with human emotions. RoboKind of Dallas, Texas has started a Kickstarter campaign to raise capital for the further development of its Zeno R25 interactive humanoid robot, which is designed to interact with humans in an intuitive way by detecting and mimicking emotions. (via Robokind Zeno R25 social robot detects and mimics emotions - Images)

Robokind Zeno R25 social robot detects and mimics emotions

More and more, robots are moving into our everyday lives, and if they’re not going to end up being incredibly annoying, they’re going to have to learn to recognize and cope with human emotions. RoboKind of Dallas, Texas has started a Kickstarter campaign to raise capital for the further development of its Zeno R25 interactive humanoid robot, which is designed to interact with humans in an intuitive way by detecting and mimicking emotions. (via Robokind Zeno R25 social robot detects and mimics emotions - Images)

Enjoy these lighthearted and fun robotics videos while you can, because we’re slowly but surely creeping up on IROS and IREX. As of November third, it’s going to be all serious business, as we embrace insanity by attempting to bring you one of the world’s largest research robotics conferences and the world’s largest robot exhibition at the same time. We have just three more Fridays to psych ourselves up for this task, but it’s not quite time to panic just yet, so let’s start things off with today with a nice, friendly robot ape. iStruct, that robotic ape from DFKI in Germany, can now stand up on its hind legs, making the transition from quadruped to biped that took humans like a million years to successfully pull off (via Video Friday: Return of the Robot Ape, Anki Drive Battle Mode, and Why We Love Robots - IEEE Spectrum)

Enjoy these lighthearted and fun robotics videos while you can, because we’re slowly but surely creeping up on IROS and IREX. As of November third, it’s going to be all serious business, as we embrace insanity by attempting to bring you one of the world’s largest research robotics conferences and the world’s largest robot exhibition at the same time. We have just three more Fridays to psych ourselves up for this task, but it’s not quite time to panic just yet, so let’s start things off with today with a nice, friendly robot ape. iStruct, that robotic ape from DFKI in Germany, can now stand up on its hind legs, making the transition from quadruped to biped that took humans like a million years to successfully pull off (via Video Friday: Return of the Robot Ape, Anki Drive Battle Mode, and Why We Love Robots - IEEE Spectrum)

Re-purposed welding robot can forge any painting it’s shown
It takes years of practice and intense concentration to master the art of painting, or if you’re a welding robot, just some really good programming. In a studio at the University of Konztanz in Germany just such a robot is dabbing its brush in paint as it works. The robot is called e-David, and it can reproduce any work of art it’s shown.
A welding robot is actually a good choice for a makeshift artist. These robot arms have three degrees of freedom in order to precisely aim a torch at bits of metal. It can just as easily be programmed to point a paintbrush at canvases as an arc welder at car doors. Researchers have given e-David a palette of 24 colors to work with, and it does okay for a robot. (via Re-purposed welding robot can forge any painting it’s shown | News | Geek.com)

Re-purposed welding robot can forge any painting it’s shown

It takes years of practice and intense concentration to master the art of painting, or if you’re a welding robot, just some really good programming. In a studio at the University of Konztanz in Germany just such a robot is dabbing its brush in paint as it works. The robot is called e-David, and it can reproduce any work of art it’s shown.

A welding robot is actually a good choice for a makeshift artist. These robot arms have three degrees of freedom in order to precisely aim a torch at bits of metal. It can just as easily be programmed to point a paintbrush at canvases as an arc welder at car doors. Researchers have given e-David a palette of 24 colors to work with, and it does okay for a robot. (via Re-purposed welding robot can forge any painting it’s shown | News | Geek.com)