Join our Mailing List
body { -webkit-animation-delay: 0.1s; -webkit-animation-name: fontfix; -webkit-animation-duration: 0.1s; -webkit-animation-iteration-count: 1; -webkit-animation-timing-function: linear; } @-webkit-keyframes fontfix { from { opacity: 1; } to { opacity: 1; } } /* ]]> */

A Momentary Flow

Evolving Worldviews

The problem of human consciousness looms large, not just in the quantum problem. In thinking about thinking we have to use thought. Our brains are computational machines like any other, and so presumably subject to the same fundamental limits on their ability to reason. So what allows the human mind to establish that there are limits beyond which it cannot think?

The edge of reason: When logic fails us - physics-math - 04 November 2013 - New Scientist

Keep in mind that life on Earth isn’t going to be getting easier throughout all that future time—it will be getting harder, as the planet becomes less and less conducive for complex life. So we may have—we may be—the only chance available for life on Earth to somehow escape a final, ultimate planetary and stellar death. If we don’t do that, then the book’s title would become a prophecy: After fading into oblivion, the sum total of life’s history on Earth will only be billions of years of solitude.

Are We Alone? - Ross Andersen - The Atlantic

Q: Wait a minute. What do you mean, the universe is a mathematical structure?

M.T.: So right now, I’m eating an orange, which is made of cells. Why do they have the properties they do? Well, because they’re made of molecules. Why do the molecules have their properties? Because they’re made of atoms put together in a certain way. Why do the atoms have those properties? Because they’re made of quarks and electrons. What about the electron? What properties does it have? And the cool thing is, all the properties that electrons have are purely mathematical. It’s just a list of numbers. So in that sense, an electron is a purely mathematical object. In fact, there’s no evidence right now that there’s anything at all in our universe that is not mathematical.

Do We Live Inside a Mathematical Equation? - ScienceNOW
What is the purpose of the Universe? Here is one possible answer.
-
The more we learn about the universe, the more we discover just how diverse all its planets, stars, nebulae and unexplained chunks of matter really are. So what is all this matter doing in our universe, other than just floating in space? Well, it just so happens that there is a theory that gives a kind of raison d’etre to our universe and all the objects flying through it. If true, it would mean that our universe is nothing more than a black hole generator, or a means to produce as many baby universes as possible. To learn more, we spoke to the man who came up with the idea. It’s called the theory of Cosmological Natural Selection and it was conjured by Lee Smolin, a researcher at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics and and an adjunct professor of physics at the University of Waterloo. (via What is the purpose of the Universe? Here is one possible answer.)

What is the purpose of the Universe? Here is one possible answer.

-

The more we learn about the universe, the more we discover just how diverse all its planets, stars, nebulae and unexplained chunks of matter really are. So what is all this matter doing in our universe, other than just floating in space? Well, it just so happens that there is a theory that gives a kind of raison d’etre to our universe and all the objects flying through it. If true, it would mean that our universe is nothing more than a black hole generator, or a means to produce as many baby universes as possible. To learn more, we spoke to the man who came up with the idea. It’s called the theory of Cosmological Natural Selection and it was conjured by Lee Smolin, a researcher at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics and and an adjunct professor of physics at the University of Waterloo. (via What is the purpose of the Universe? Here is one possible answer.)

The universe may grow like a giant brain, according to a new computer simulation. The results, published Nov. 16 in the journal Nature’s Scientific Reports, suggest that some undiscovered, fundamental laws may govern the growth of systems large and small, from the electrical firing between brain cells and growth of social networks to the expansion of galaxies. “Natural growth dynamics are the same for different real networks, like the Internet or the brain or social networks,” said study co-author Dmitri Krioukov, a physicist at the University of California San Diego. The new study suggests a single fundamental law of nature may govern these networks, said physicist Kevin Bassler of the University of Houston, who was not involved in the study. [ What’s That? Your Physics Questions Answered ] “At first blush they seem to be quite different systems, the question is, is there some kind of controlling laws can describe them?” he told LiveScience. By raising this question, “their work really makes a pretty important contribution,” he said. (via Universe may grow like a giant brain - Technology & science - Science - LiveScience | NBC News)

The universe may grow like a giant brain, according to a new computer simulation. The results, published Nov. 16 in the journal Nature’s Scientific Reports, suggest that some undiscovered, fundamental laws may govern the growth of systems large and small, from the electrical firing between brain cells and growth of social networks to the expansion of galaxies. “Natural growth dynamics are the same for different real networks, like the Internet or the brain or social networks,” said study co-author Dmitri Krioukov, a physicist at the University of California San Diego. The new study suggests a single fundamental law of nature may govern these networks, said physicist Kevin Bassler of the University of Houston, who was not involved in the study. [ What’s That? Your Physics Questions Answered ] “At first blush they seem to be quite different systems, the question is, is there some kind of controlling laws can describe them?” he told LiveScience. By raising this question, “their work really makes a pretty important contribution,” he said. (via Universe may grow like a giant brain - Technology & science - Science - LiveScience | NBC News)

Think about it this way: previously we thought that our universe was like a spherical balloon. In the new picture, it’s like a balloon producing balloons, producing balloons. This is a big fractal. The Greeks were thinking about our universe as an ideal sphere, because this was the best image they had at their disposal. The 20th century idea is a fractal, the beauty of a fractal. Now, you have these fractals. We ask, how many different types of these elements of fractals are there, which are irreducible to each other? And the number will be exponentially large, and in the simplest models it is about 10 to the degree 10, to the degree 10, to the degree 7. It actually may be much more than that, even though nobody can see all of these universes at once. ANDREI LINDE, a Russian-American theoretical physicist and professor of Physics at Stanford University, is the father of “eternal chaotic inflation”, one of the varieties of the inflationary multiverse theory, which proposes that the universe may consist of many universes with different properties. He is an inaugural winner of the $3 million Fundamental Physics Prize, awarded by the Milner Foundation. In 2002, he was awarded the Dirac Medal, along with Alan Guth of MIT and Paul Steinhardt of Princeton University.

A Balloon Producing Balloons, Producing Balloons: a Big Fractal  | Conversation | Edge